Thinking Anglicans

Saturday Opinions

The Guardian has a Face to Faith column by Emma Klein and Judy Cooper who ask whether forgiveness is always appropriate.

The Times has a Credo column by Roderick Strange about prayer and unbearable pain.

In The Tablet Anthony Carroll, in Faith, reason and modernity, looks closely at what the Pope said in Regensburg earlier this month, and Elena Curti reports on the results of the paper’s survey on Christian-Muslim relations.

In his Sacred Mysteries column in the Telegraph Christopher Howse writes about a wallhanging in Girona cathedral depicting the creation.

In the Church Times the leader looks at the communiqué issued by the primates who met at Kigali. Giles Fraser writes about golf and Christianity, and makes a plea for more socializing by the bishops at the next Lambeth Conference.

Sunday addition

Nick Cohen in The Observer I can barely Adam and Eve it, but creationism’s catching on over here.

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Cheryl Cloughdrdanfee*Christopher Recent comment authors
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Cheryl Clough
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Klein and Coopers’ article on forgiveness seems pertinent to these times. Coincidentally, Oprah had a show last week with a case study of a woman who had married a pathological liar. The show looked at how she had coped with the emotional pain of finding out apalling stuff (e.g. sister was ex-wife, dead parents were still alive), which also links into Strange’s article. There is a common thread that weaves back to the fracas in the communion. In the Oprah show they they discussed how it was only possible to remain as his wife, despite his abuse and lies, by… Read more »

*Christopher
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Of course, these folks aren’t the one being abused. I have yet to see someone opposed to inclusion of non-celibate homosexuals get bullied for their stance, beat up, put in prison, murdered, or kill themselves. Looking around, it seems more and more queer folk come to the conclusion that the perpetrator, in this case, the Church won’t stop, and they leave.

drdanfee
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drdanfee

Hi again CherylC and all, I always enjoy your CC posts, although admittedly your widely read scope of connotation often reminds me how far behind I am in my own neglected reading lists. If we wish to speculate about just how the realigned Anglican Communion is meant to be, at least in the USA, if not perhaps also around the world, we have to factor in lots of elements, including the unexpected and the many things which actually cannot be controlled by right-leaning believer theories, their claims to be exclusively biblical notwithstanding. At the bottom of the article links I… Read more »

drdanfee
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drdanfee

The most troubling thing about this new Anglican conserved movement continues to be its closed approach to anything important, and its totalisms of mind and body and heart, and its consistent tendencies to think in categorical Either/Or narratives. These habits of mind, heart, and body and community will, above all, undo or effectively dissolve the real historical complexities of which it has traditionally meant to be an Anglican believer. Canterbury had better be prepared to talk to itself in all the local mirrors, while being daily redacted as nothing but legal-penal support for the new realigned Anglican party covenant line.… Read more »

Cheryl Clough
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drdanfee. It isn’t necessarily a case of being well read, but of recognising public examples of hard learnt private lessons. Practical experience makes it easier to recognise when others are going through the same thing. For example, both my sister and I had a lot of empathy with that Austrian girl who was kept a virtual prisoner for eight years. It is possible to be in a state of bondage even though one appears to be moving normally through society, sociopaths can engineer things privately so that publicly there is not a hint of what goes on behind closed doors.… Read more »

drdanfee
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drdanfee

Ah dear CC, it is this active upwelling of the personal into our political-social-institutional, the scripture read through the eyes of variant believers who have unpredicted experiences of redemption against all external-institutional-social-family odds that would be narrowed, undone, and defined as heresy by our newly realigned instruments of communion. The really good news still is that Jesus is teaching outside the temple, just as much as inside. Do keep on keeping on, as some of us continue to talk, pray, and journey, one with another. Neither Africa, nor Asia, nor Canterbury can actually stop that, and I think that is… Read more »

Cheryl Clough
Guest

I came across this article while doing the news research this morning: http://www.vanguardngr.com/articles/2002/cover/october06/01102006/f901102006.html The article opens with “Ambassador (Rev) Elizabeth Ogbon-Day, a Baptist cleric, is Nigeria’s first woman envoy and a strong advocate of social justice.” Her comments about helping the Niger-Delta are interesting, and I note that she too has a passion for accountability at all levels of society as a means of overcoming corruption; and she suggests the voices of women, children and the grassroots need to be heard if they are to overcome intransigent problems. The other thing that struck me is that her description of living… Read more »