Thinking Anglicans

opinion

David Gibson writes in the Huffington Post about Mary Breastfeeding Jesus: Christmas’ Missing Icon.

This article by Philip Jones for Ecclesiastical Law was published several months ago, but may be particularly relevant now: The Two Structures of the Church of England: Pyramids with Grass Roots.

Lizzy Davies of The Observer has been talking to Philippa Boardman: ‘Every day I wear purple’.

And finally Professor Brian Cox rides to the Rescue of Women Bishops.

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kennedy fraser
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kennedy fraser

wrt breastfeeding Mary, the lady chapel at the Cathedral of the Isles in Millport, Cumbrae, Scotland has a picture of Mary breastfeeding.

Labarum
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Labarum

Thank you for the “Two structures” link. It clears up some of the muddle in my mind – only some. It does seem to indicate that the defence of doctrine and right worship is vested in the bishops in consultation with the priests and maybe the deacons; and whereas lay voices may be heard in the discussion of matters doctrinal, ritual and ceremonial, their right to be assertive is very limited. Their views carry much more weight when considering the secular management of the church. This would seem to be the ancient and the present constitutional position, and it sets… Read more »

Father David
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Father David

An interesting article on ikons of Our Lady breast feeding the infant Lord – or what was referred to on “Little Britain” as “bitty”.
In that wonderful musical ikon – “In the bleak mid winter” (surely no carol can surpass the beauty of its poetry) we have that tremendous line:-
“A breastful of milk and a mangerful of hay” for the One whom “Cherubim worship night and day”.
Also, in opposition to the papal ban on animals in the stable – there we find not only the “ox and ass” but also the “camel” in worshipful attendance.

David d'Ambly
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David d'Ambly

Numerous Flemish, French and German painters of the early renaissance depicted this once popular image with great beauty and sensitivity. It is interesting that in an age of over sexualisation we somehow recoil at depicting such intimacy.