Thinking Anglicans

Installation of the Archbishop of Canterbury

Updated Friday morning

Justin Welby was installed as Archbishop of Canterbury and Primate of All England in a service at Canterbury Cathedral this afternoon. This event is commonly called his enthronement, although this word does not appear in the order of service.

Articles looking ahead to the service

The Archbishop’s website published this on Tuesday: What happens when an Archbishop is enthroned?

Robert Piggott for the BBC How new the Archbishop of Canterbury will be enthroned

Order of Service: “The Inauguration of the Ministry of the One Hundreth and Fifth Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Portal Welby”

A recording of the service is available to UK viewers on the BBC iPlayer for the next seven days.

Text of the Archbishop’s sermon

Reports of the service

The Anglican Communion News Service has these Photographs from the Enthronement.

BBC Justin Welby is enthroned as Archbishop of Canterbury [includes video highlights]

Paul Handley, Ed Thornton and Rachel Boulding in the Church Times Dancing welcome for Archbishop Welby

John Bingham in the Telegraph Justin Welby enthroned as 105th Archbishop of Canterbury

Sam Jones and agency in The Guardian Justin Welby enthroned as archbishop of Canterbury
Also in The Guardian Justin Welby enthroned as new archbishop at Canterbury Cathedral – video
and Archbishop of Canterbury enthronement – in pictures

Liz Dodd in The Tablet Welby enthroned as 105th Archbishop of Canterbury

Cheryl Mullin in the Liverpool Echo Justin Welby is enthroned as Archbishop of Canterbury [includes photographs]

Matthew Davies at Episcopal News Service
Archbishop of Canterbury enthroned in ancient splendor [includes video]
Video: Designer Juliet Hemingray on the archbishop’s vestments

For comparison, here are highlights of the enthronement of Geoffrey Fisher in 1945.

Update Friday morning

The paper edition of The Guardian printed this photograph as a double page spread.

The Enthronement in pictures from Canterbury Cathedral

Anglican Communion News Service Archbishop Welby enthroned in Canterbury Cathedral

Quentin Letts in the Mail Online African dancers, bongo drums and a Punjabi hymn… the oh-so modern arrival of Britain’s new Archbishop [lots of photographs]

Photographs on the Archbishop’s Facebook page
The same photographs are on also the Archbishop’s website.

Sam Jones in The Guardian Justin Welby enthroned as new archbishop of Canterbury

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Father David
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Father David

I seem to remember that when Justin Welby was enthroned at Durham – he was taken to task for wearing his mitre on the back of his head! It is good to see that the archiepiscopal mitre was level for the Canterbury enthronements and firmly placed on his head which made our new spiritual leader look most dignified. A good beginning. God bless you, Archbishop Justin.

Shelley H
Guest

Sad that the rebroadcast isn’t available outside the UK. There are Anglicans all over the world who would love to watch.

Father David
Guest
Father David

Good heavens! Front page Headline in today’s Times – “Archbishop opens a new era of ‘optimism'”
How long is it since the Church of England and the wider Anglican Communion received such a positive Headline like that? In the light of this great new era of optimism – which I wholeheartedly welcome – I may even have to take up jogging!

MarkBrunson
Guest

Remember: after the installation, you need to keep both the service number and the warranty card.

Concerned Anglican
Guest
Concerned Anglican

Any evidence of Global South bishops snubbing or boycotting was absent as were their minders from the breakaway American groups such as ACNA – which is surely a good thing and in the spirit of the Times headline about ‘optimism’.

John
Guest
John

One does feel a throb of tribal loyalty – even perhaps a prickling behind the eyes.

Rosie Bates
Guest

Shelley H – If you are able to download Expat Shield (there is a free version and I have encountered no problems with this) the Service is available on BBC IPlayer for seven days.

Simon Kershaw
Admin

Perhaps one of the most encouraging things about the service is, as David Walker (Bp of Dudley and TA columnist) has pointed out, that the congregation boycotted the words ‘the wrath of God’ and sang instead ‘the love of God’ in the hymn ‘In Christ Alone’. Whilst one may have doubts about singing that the love of God was satisfied by the crucifixion, it’s a different universe from the one in which ‘the wrath of God is satisfied’ by the crucifixion. Whilst the OoS prints ‘wrath’ the congregation do seem to have ignored it and sung ‘love’. Maybe there is… Read more »

Craig Nelson
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Craig Nelson

In Christ Alone is a truly beautiful hymn (in many respects) but inserting penal substitution into the middle of it does take something away I feel.

Father David
Guest
Father David

Would churches be fuller if we had a greater emphasis at times upon DIES IRAE? Just a thought!

Pauline
Guest
Pauline

Both wrath and love of God were satisfied at the Cross

Pam Smith
Guest

While not wishing to derail the thread into penal substitution, Jeremy Fletcher has written an interesting blog on ‘in Christ Alone’ and that particular line here:

http://lifeafterliturgy.wordpress.com/2010/09/24/in-christ-alone-controversial/

Father Ron Smith
Guest

I noticed a distinct lack of episcopal mitres at the ‘inauguration’. Is this going to set a trend for the future? Or is the new ABC preparing the way for a more friendly visit from TEC’s Presiding Bishop, and wants to put her at ease by not wearing a mitre himself? Perhaps not a bad move.

Simon Sarmiento
Guest

The wearing of choir dress by attending bishops is entirely normal practice at Church of England events which are not a Eucharist (and even at episcopal ordinations except for the presiding archbishop and his two assisting bishops).

Mitres are not worn with choir dress.

Laurence Roberts
Guest
Laurence Roberts

Would churches be fuller if we had a greater emphasis at times upon DIES IRAE? Just a thought!

Posted by: Father David on Saturday, 23 March 2013 at 10:37am

No David !

(‘just’ a thought)

johnny may
Guest
johnny may

To give a fair impression to our brothers and sisters of the international Anglican communion reading this but not based in the USA/Canada/UK, it must be said that it is abundantly clear that the thriving parts of the Church of England in England absolutely believe in penal substitution. Like it or not, when one looks at what the growing churches of the UK have in common the single thing that stands out is a belief in some form of actual penal substitution. It is therefore both unsurprising and appropriate that the ABC affirmed that in his choice of hymns. Unless… Read more »

Father Ron Smith
Guest

“Mitres are not worn with choir dress”.

But sometimes are worn with copes? n’est-ce pas?

Commentator
Guest
Commentator

Johnny: To give a fair impression of the Church of England the solid middle does not support penal substitution as the ONLY way to understand the Atonement. And there are many thriving churches that choose to reject it in favour of participatory theories of the Atonement. I rather think the differences are born of vocal versus quiet Christianity. But it is about time that the quiet voices gave expression to the depth of their belief and the wonderous loving nature of God that this proclaims.

Anne
Guest
Anne

My church is growing, Johnny, and I have never, and would never preach penal substitution. One of the reasons my church has been growing is that I have steadily been picking up “refugees” from churches which do preach this, as well as those who were not churchgoers at all. When those who have made their way to my church talk about why they used to go to those churches, some of which are enormous and wealthy, they usually tell me that it was because a lot of other people went there, or that there were a lot of children and… Read more »

Malcolm Dixon
Guest
Malcolm Dixon

Well said, Anne. May our loving God continue to look with favour on you and your inclusive church, and lead others to join you.

MarkBrunson
Guest

If you are a Christian out of fear of Hell or desire to go to Heaven, I’m not sure you can really be a Christian. Where is your unconditional love of God? You would just be trading favors, no better (or worse) than the older form of idolatry, trading blood for good crops.

Simon Kershaw
Admin

My God, I love thee; not because I hope for heaven thereby, nor yet because who love thee not are lost eternally. Thou, O Lord Jesus, thou didst me upon the cross embrace; for me didst bear the nails and spear, and manifold disgrace, And griefs and torments numberless, and sweat of agony; yea, death itself; and all for me who was thine enemy. Then why, O blessed Jesus Christ, should I not love thee well, not for the sake of winning heaven, nor any fear of hell; Not with the hope of gaining aught, not seeking a reward; but… Read more »