Thinking Anglicans

Future composition of the Lords Spiritual

David Pocklington has written for Law & Religion UK about the Future composition of the Lords Spiritual.

The announcement to both Houses of the Royal Assent to the Bishops and Priests (Consecration and Ordination of Women) Measure completed the parliamentary stages of the legislation and brought to the fore the issue of “fast tracking” women in the episcopate to the Lords Spiritual…

The issues that remain, therefore, are: how this is to be accomplished; and what form this fast-tracking/positive discrimination will take…

He goes on to explain why this will require an Act of Parliament rather than a Church Measure. He then looks at what might replace the present “Buggins’ turn” method of appointing the most senior diocesan bishops and allow women more quickly to join the Lords Spiritual.

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Martin ReynoldsFather DavidAnthony ArcherConcerned Anglicanian Recent comment authors
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Kelvin Holdsworth
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It seems to me that this might be a particularly productive time for those of us who are faithful Anglicans who don’t want any bishops to have a place in the House of Lords, to say so loudly to our MPs.

Jeremy Pemberton
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Jeremy Pemberton

If Ed Miliband wins in May I think there will be no space for the Rt Revd Prelates, male or female, in the New Senate. And gone will be the hereditaries as well.

Tim M
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Tim M

At a time when senior politicians are discussing in public the abolition of the House of Lords, it’s looking more like the days of the “Lords spiritual” are numbered.

robert Ian williams
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robert Ian williams

Are bishops in the labour senatorial proposals? I am in broad agreement with Kelvin.

Father David
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Father David

Not much point in bothering about all of this because when the “Brilliant Comrade” wins the next General Election the House of Lords will be abolished, replaced by an elected Senate sitting, no doubt, somewhere in the North of England.

ian
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ian

Experience has shown that whatever is put in the party manifesto, concerning the abolishion of the House of Lords, nothing ever happens. A pity, because I am firmly in favour of the Bishops losing their right to sit in the Lords. I do think, however, that there could be a place for faith representatives sitting in whatever second chamber looks like in the future, if the parties could finally come to some sort of agreement. I’m not holding my breath.

Concerned Anglican
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Concerned Anglican

As one who strongly supports women bishops but who has counselled against ‘fast-tracking’ them into the House of Lords.

– Beware, I say of the law of unintended consequences. You may consequently fast-track all of the bishops out of whatever emerges as the next second chamber.

Anthony Archer
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Anthony Archer

Looks like the draft Bill will simply put the decision as to who receives the writ in the hands of the Church of England. I am not sure whether that is helpful. Who will decide? The Archbishops? The Appointments Committee? Better to have a formula over a fixed period of time that will preserve ‘buggin’s turn’ but alternate between the senior male bishop and the senior female bishop (if there is one) until there is gender balance between the 21 or the period ends, whichever is sooner.

Father David
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Father David

Am I alone in thinking that Thinking Anglicans has rather gone off the boil of late and is nowhere near as exciting or vibrant as it once used to be? Certainly the number of comments on the occasional posts are nowhere near as numerous as they once were!

Martin Reynolds
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Martin Reynolds

You are not alone.

Though its amazing just how few Anglican blogs have survived in any shape …….
There was talk some time ago of increasing the scope and editorial board and taking the strain from the few who have maintained this site for ever.