Thinking Anglicans

opinion

Andrew Brown The Guardian Faith no more: how the British are losing their religion

Michael Sadgrove On Reaching a Certain Age

David Benady PR Week Spreading the word

Ian Duffield Signs of the Times The 2015 proposals to re-brand the Church of England

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Father Ron Smith
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re Ian Duffield’s article – about the re-branding of the Church of England; it would seem that the visiting GAFCON Primates, under the leadership of the ex-Archbishop of Sydney, Peter Jensen, have now named a new charity, ‘GFCA’, which will manage their agenda for the ‘conversion of England’ by providing an alternative Anglican Church in U.K. Surely, now is the time for the Archbishops of Canterbury and York to resist this challenge to the role of the Church of England? Did the Church not take any note of the devastation caused to the local Anglican Provinces of the USA and… Read more »

Simon Butler
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Simon Butler

Same old tired critique from Ian Duffield. I’ve yet to see any coherent proposals come from liberal colleagues. Meanwhile the grey hairs get greyer in the pews and the faithful are denied the opportunity to explore their vocation as disciples.

Pam
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Pam

Michael Sadgrove’s article reminded me of a book I enjoyed reading recently. It’s called “What Days Are For” by Robert Dessaix and it’s based around a near-death experience of the author. Philip Larkin’s wonderful poem “Days” forms a significant part of the book. It’s a short poem, rich in meaning. Last stanza: “Ah, solving that question/Brings the priest and the doctor/In their long coats/Running over the fields.” I recommend this book, not written particularly from a Christian perspective, highly.

John
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John

As a liberal, I wholly agree with Simon Butler.

Simon R
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Simon R

The wisdom and humanity of Michael Sadgrove is inspiring. This was not gained on an ecclesiastical MBA programme, of course; but by years of patient study, prayer, reflection and pastoral care, sustained by rigorous theological formation. How very different from the formulaic and shallow proposals in RME and its near-relations.