Thursday, 15 March 2007

ABC on Slavery via YouTube

This project was pre-announced some time ago.

Lambeth Palace has now announced the use of YouTube by the Archbishop of Canterbury. Read the press release Archbishops online reflection - ‘Slavery still with us’.

This has been reported in The Times by Ruth Gledhill as Archbishop of Canterbury makes YouTube debut, and is discussed further on her blog at Archbishop goes live on YouTube.

Dave Walker has links to numerous related sites at Making our mark.

When this project was first announced, wannabepriest was concerned about whether this was a good idea. He now has Credit where credit is due…

What do other people think about it now?

Posted by Simon Sarmiento on Thursday, 15 March 2007 at 2:48pm GMT | TrackBack
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Categorised as: Church of England
Comments

The page describing the channel says, "video material about the Archbishop of Canterbury and featuring Dr Rowan Williams, the 104th Archbishop"

Not about Jesus Christ, not about Christianity, not about Anglicanism even, but the ABC Rowie Willums.

The 'director' ID is put as 'lambethpress'. Tacky. Confirming for the viewer that the advert is for the ABC.

They begin (and continue) with an old churchy hymn. If this assisted bringing the Good News to people in a postmodern context, then Songs of Praise (UK TV religous programme) would have converted the nation by now. It is laughable in this medium.

Have they consulted nobody about this? Did they all sit around in the office trying to pretend they knew what they were doing so they would each seem 'in touch with the street, man'.

This is catagorically the worst advert for Christianity, for Anglicanism since it started 'dissing' the queers.

Yo.

More seriously though, I find it repugnant that the memory of slaves' suffering is used in this way - apparently to promote the ABC and ABY. 'Oh, look how caring we are. We don't like slavery and suffering - look at me, this is how to be decent.' Then the excuse of a point that maybe we are labouring under other kinds of slavery is quickly muttered as an aside. Patronising, embarrassing tosh.

Utter silliness. Watching it, I find myself waiting for the punchline that never comes. Just when you think 'pythonesque' might finally be passe, here it is in your face.

It's real. How could they be so arrogant not to consult before doing this. I'm truly stunned at how bad this looks.

Posted by: matthew hunt on Thursday, 15 March 2007 at 3:40pm GMT

Change involves risk. Sometimes something works out, other times it doesn't. Sometimes what you think is going to fly turns out to be a dead duck. Other times a throw away line becomes the catch phrase for the new trend.

I am glad to see them innovating and trying out new things. They can tweak and pitch based on experience and feedback. A church that is not prepared to innovate and experiment is a church that is dying.

As one advisor once said to me, librarians and accountants can not run the world because they record and/or preserve the picture of what has been.

If you want to see what the world is going to look like, you need to be out in the fields, not locked away behind ivory bars. Then, when you rub shoulders with real people, you realise that your theology needs to address real needs e.g. Joseph, who was respected for his fairness and ability to provide.

I am glad to see ABC and Sentamus' contemplations. I liked their awareness of the ethical and psychological modes of slavery, and how they can apply in a modern day context.

Posted by: Cheryl Clough on Thursday, 15 March 2007 at 7:56pm GMT

Stand Firm Interviews: Andrew Carey on ++Williams' Statement

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZu_ZVayU54

Posted by: Erika Baker on Friday, 16 March 2007 at 1:37pm GMT
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