Monday, 14 July 2008

Presiding Bishop visits Salisbury

Christopher Landau of the BBC has a report Sexuality stance ‘embarrasses’ Anglicans.

Episcopal News Service has this report by Matthew Davies of her Sunday activities in Salisbury, Salisbury diocese welcomes Presiding Bishop, Sudanese bishops for pre-Lambeth hospitality initiative.

Posted by Simon Sarmiento on Monday, 14 July 2008 at 10:59pm BST | TrackBack
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Categorised as: Anglican Communion | Church of England | ECUSA
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Ms Schori's sermons are available here, http://tinyurl.com/schori (The word documents are linked in the reference by Mr Sarmiento.) Truly astounding and appalling. A must read. I find it hilarious that Jesus spelled out the meaning of the parable of the seeds, and she still doesn't get it.

Her main qualification for the presiding bishopric seems to be a lack of a Y chromosome.

Posted by: robroy on Tuesday, 15 July 2008 at 1:05am BST

robroy: she is not "Ms" but "Bishop" Schori. Please have the decency to use the correct title, whether or not you like her.

Posted by: Fr Mark on Tuesday, 15 July 2008 at 10:23am BST

I was at the 0810 morning prayers in Salisbury Cathedral on that day, and for me it was a good corrective to all of our current anxieties.

The service (recorded for the BBC - http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00chbtb) encouraged a meditation on the state of our Anglican church.

On the one hand there was modernity, with a woman cathedral dean presiding, a woman (arch)bishop preaching and (horror of horrors) a girls in the cathedral choir stalls.

Yet partcipating in the same service there was the Archbishop of the Sudan and his Bishops, partners of the Salisbury Diocese for 35 years, with their witness of leading a Christian Church through decades of civil war where millions died, and asking is what is really important.

And the third actor in that service was the cathedral building itself, 750 year old this year, and the successor to Old Sarum with its witness of previous centuries of worship.

With the music, and the prayers, and the sun shining through the gloriouis East window it was posible to reflect on the passions and conflict that this cathedral had seen in past centuries, and yet here we still were, worshipping together and praying together. And no doubt there will still be people worshipping and praying next week, and next month, and (global warming permitting) in centuries to come.

Life goes on, and God goes on. Let's not be so anxious.


Posted by: Simon Dawson on Tuesday, 15 July 2008 at 11:10am BST

robroy

Perhaps +Katharine has read some commentaries on the Gospel - such as those at www.textweek.com - which comment on the profligacy of the sower and his apparent wastefulness of seed, in an area of drought and famine. No farmer in Jesus' time would have sowed seed as that farmer did - seed was too precious. But God is generous enough to sow seed in even the most inhospitable places to give people a chance to grow in his Word.

Given that PB Schori clearly knows more about the Gospel passage than you appear to, what is your qualification for denigrating her in such a way?

Posted by: RichardM on Tuesday, 15 July 2008 at 11:12am BST

"Given that PB Schori clearly knows more about the Gospel passage than you appear to, what is your qualification for denigrating her in such a way?"

Robroy won't say so, but I suspect it's because he's male and she isn't.

Posted by: Pat O'Neill on Tuesday, 15 July 2008 at 11:23am BST

I heard Bishop Katharine in a Q&A session in Salisbury Cathedral on Monday evening. She dealt with some difficult questions calmly, with grace and with great competence. She was very, very impressive and the vast majority of the audience were plainly delighted to have the chance to talk with her. I came away feeling that The Episcopal Church in the US is blessed to be led by someone of her calibre.

Posted by: David Mooney on Tuesday, 15 July 2008 at 7:30pm BST

I've watched a couple of the internet video cast that KJS has done. Politically I see things in a light similar to her views. However, it seems to me that people who disagree with her views would, in any real sense of fairness, have to be impressed with her competency as a communicator. That is an essential part of leadership.

Posted by: Richard Lyon on Tuesday, 15 July 2008 at 9:50pm BST
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