Saturday, 22 November 2008

further NEAC reports

Another of the presentations has been published, this one by Michael Ovey. And this Bible Study.

Still no sign of the one by Christina Baxter.

Other presentations are linked here.

A Church of England Newspaper report of the meeting by Toby Cohen is at present only available here.

And another Church of England Newspaper article about it is A foot in many camps - a reply to Stephen Kuhrt by Chris Sugden.

Posted by Simon Sarmiento on Saturday, 22 November 2008 at 1:06pm GMT | TrackBack
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Categorised as: Church of England
Comments

"A representative organization like CEEC needs some means of establishing what makes it distinctive so that it can be seen who and what it represents" - Chris Sugden, Mainstream -

On does not have to be a Doctor of Philosophy, Theology, Psychiatric Medicine (or of anything) to already perfectly understand 'what makes CEEC distinctive so that it can be seen who and what it represents'. This was made perfectly clear at the recent Meeting of NEAC at All Souls, Langham Place.

As presently constituted, CEEC so obviously represents the parsimonious theology of Doctors Sugden, Turnbull, and others of the GAFCON crowd who are hell-bent on subduing the 'middle-ground' of mainline Evengelicalism - not only in the UK, but also in the Communion around the world.

While such rabidly doctrinaire sodalities exist in the Church, we will always have strife and contention about 'who occupies the middle ground -regardless of the breadth, height and depth of the historical Anglican ethos of 'Via Media'.

With advocates like Messrs Sugden, Turnbull, Akinola, Nzimbi and Jensen; it is no wonder that the majority of Evangelicals in the Church are resisting their claims to supremacy.

Talk about the 'Roman Catholic Magisterium'. In CEEC we have a rudely contending Evangelical one.

Posted by: Father Ron Smith on Saturday, 22 November 2008 at 6:30pm GMT

"In CEEC we have a rudely contending Evangelical one."

But isn't it amusing that the very people pushing for this kind of top down authoritarian leadership are the very ones who vehemently oppose it in Rome, indeed, many of them can't even mention Rome without spitting? It just points out that some people need a well defined authority so that they can feel secure in obedience to that authority. That some of them leave an Evangelicalism that loudly denounces Rome in order to become members of the Roman Communion (how's that for a new term?) shows that it is authority, and not doctrine, that acutally shapes their churchmanship.

Posted by: Ford Elms on Wednesday, 26 November 2008 at 4:56pm GMT

The Rev'd Canon Sugden is clearly a candidate for bishop in the new 'Anglican' Province in the UK. He is every where and always ready to impart his wisdom. So perhaps I under estimate him, he is actually a candidate for the Primate's job in the new 'Anglican Province in the UK!

Posted by: Commentator on Thursday, 27 November 2008 at 3:26pm GMT

Dear Commentator (in disguise?),

I wouldn't put too much emphasis on the possibility of Dr. Sugden as having the mana to become a bishop in the Church of God - under any circumstance - except that of one of the ex-Anglican sects that are still flourishing in North America, parts of Africa, and the province of The Southern Cone of South America.

It could, however, be quite possible for him to take some lead role in an off-shore province of the newly-emerging Church of the Truly Perfect, which is the brain-child of Drs. Turner, Akinola and Sugden. But, in the light of the recent failure of CEEC to gain credibility in the NEAC Meeting at All Souls, Langham Place, even the Strict Evangelicals may now find it difficult to form a basis for the re-Asserters in the U.K.

Posted by: Father Ron Smith on Thursday, 27 November 2008 at 10:25pm GMT
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