Thursday, 12 November 2009

UK government accepts Waddington amendment

For the background to this, see previous posts:
Waddington amendment upheld in Lords July 2009
bishops oppose repeal of Waddington amendment May 2009
Anglican and Roman church bodies comment jointly November 2007
incitement extension proposed October 2007

Today, the UK government finally accepted, with reluctance, the amendment supported repeatedly, by the House of Lords and rejected, also repeatedly, by the House of Commons.

See today’s news reports:

The Bishop of Winchester spoke in one of the debates, and you can read what he said here.

Posted by Simon Sarmiento on Thursday, 12 November 2009 at 6:39pm GMT | TrackBack
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Categorised as: equality legislation
Comments

"The Lord Bishop of Winchester: 'My Lords, I shall say very little because virtually everything I wished to say has been said by the noble Lords, Lord Wasddington and Lord Dear, and by the noble and learned Lord, Lord Mackay' "

On Lordy. Lordy! When are the Bishops of the Church of England going to surrender their thrones in the House of Lords? It really is about time this anachronistic situation is put to the sword!

My Lord of Winchester is scarcely upholding the common law of justice when he aids and abets the entitlement of the Upper House to over-rule the d House of Commons' democratic decision to outlaw the rules of discrimination against LGBTs in the UK. This Lordly re-action will find support within the Government of Uganda, which will shortly, if not halted in its progress, pass further hate laws against the LGBT community in that country.

That the Church of England should use its power in the House of Lords to enfranchise the use of *free speech* against the gay community in this day and age is beyond belief. + Winchester's defence of discriminatory behaviour will no doubt please the advocates of GAFCON, whose hatred of gays in the Church is becoming endemic in parts of Third World 'Christianity'.

This is a clear case of the need to dismantle the place of Anglican bishops in the House of Lords.

Posted by: Father Ron Smith on Thursday, 12 November 2009 at 11:17pm GMT

The Anglican Communion receives another black eye from the CofE!

No wonder everyone regards Anglicanism as a joke when you've got the likes of Winchester.

Posted by: MarkBrunson on Friday, 13 November 2009 at 7:19am GMT

Exactly. The Church, as ever, places itself on the side of bigotry and prejudice.

Humanist groups took the opposite view.

Posted by: Merseymike on Friday, 13 November 2009 at 12:40pm GMT

The CoE is quickly becoming something with which no decent person would want to be associated.

Posted by: JPM on Friday, 13 November 2009 at 2:14pm GMT

The Waddington business ensures that things will have to get even worse - particularly for the fondly targeted queer folks in UK - before anybody will consider not trash talking them with high Anglican religion, especially of the evangelical and AngloCatholic varieties. I would sadly guess it has to get really nasty, as in the USA killing of Matthew Shepherd and so many others, before anybody thinks twice before trash talking queer folks who are the lowest neighbors on the church life evangelical or catholic rankings.

Silent nods, Rubbing shoulders with this sort of Anglican believer is really getting deeply painful; ordinary garden variety social and church life embarrassment is the least of it. Do not bring us to these sorts of mean tests, then, but deliver us from these evils.

Posted by: drdanfee on Friday, 13 November 2009 at 6:35pm GMT

If someone is still looking here:
I know very little about the workings of the British Parliament, but my understanding is that the House of Commons can override opposition by the House of Lords.
If so, what's the procedure for this to take place, and is there any chance that the Government might employ this during a future session of Parliamentt?

Posted by: peterpi on Saturday, 14 November 2009 at 3:28am GMT
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