Monday, 30 January 2012

public opinion surveys on bishops in the House of Lords

British Religion in Numbers reports on the survey behind the claim made by the Sun that

‘Six out of ten Brits think bishops should be booted out of the House of Lords after defeating plans to cap benefits at £26,000 a year.’

As BRIN explains, in Lords Spiritual:

The survey was undertaken online on 24 January 2012, among a sample of 749 adults aged 18 and over, and in the wake of the amendment to the Bill passed by the House of Lords the previous night, which had the effect of excluding child benefit from the £26,000 cap being proposed by the Government. Data tables have been posted at: http://cdn.yougov.com/cumulus_uploads/document/pbzn4ckvyb/YG-Archives-Pol-Sun-BishopsHouseLords-260112.pdf

Read the full article for reference to an earlier (2010) survey on the same topic, and look in the comments for a further link to yet another recent survey, this one for the Sunday Times.

All this has some relevance to the forthcoming General Synod debate on a Private Member’s Motion on House of Lords Reform.

The briefing papers are here:

Tony Berry and April Alexander
Background Note by the Secretary General

Posted by Simon Sarmiento on Monday, 30 January 2012 at 6:43pm GMT | TrackBack
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Categorised as: Church of England
Comments

Alright! Right up there with our (U.S.) Republicans! Old men that just don't have a clue....

Posted by: evensongjunkie on Monday, 30 January 2012 at 9:17pm GMT

Any decent statistician will tell you that on-line surveys aren't worth the time it takes to read the results. Why? They are essentially "self-selecting"--the only people who respond to them are those with an interest in the questions, as opposed to true random surveys, where the respondents are chosen at random from among a statistically representative sample of the population. When surveys are done by legitimate polling organizations, they even allow for "non-responding" individuals, so that they maintain a truly representative sample.

Posted by: Pat O'Neill on Monday, 30 January 2012 at 10:09pm GMT

One good reform would be to retire those Lords' Spiritual (e.g. George Carey) from the House of Lords, who now have little to do with democratic reform in the context of national government, and who should be encouraged to remain silent.

Posted by: Father ron Smith on Tuesday, 31 January 2012 at 12:16am GMT

'Six out of ten Brits think bishops should be booted out of the House of Lords after defeating plans to cap benefits at £26,000 a year' -- this appears to be an affirmation of Lord Carey's position, not a rejection of it.

Posted by: cseitz on Tuesday, 31 January 2012 at 2:23pm GMT

Lord Carey is no longer a Lord Spiritual; he now holds a Life Peerage, which is customarily granted to a retiring archbishop, Ron.

Posted by: Simon Sarmiento on Tuesday, 31 January 2012 at 2:52pm GMT

YouGov is a highly respected and respectable polling organisation, Pat. Take a look for example at this page
http://www.yougov.co.uk/about/about-methodology.asp

Posted by: Simon Sarmiento on Tuesday, 31 January 2012 at 3:14pm GMT

OK--my bad. I'm used to things here in the States where the big pollsters--Gallup and the like--never use on-line surveys.

Posted by: Pat O'Neill on Tuesday, 31 January 2012 at 6:35pm GMT

Thanks, Simon, for that correction. It wouldn't be a bad idea if retiring Archbishops were to quietly refuse the title of lord - either spiritual or secular. Continuing membership of the House of Lords does seem a bit anachronistic, especially in the sphere of 'holy religion'.

Posted by: Father ron Smith on Tuesday, 31 January 2012 at 11:36pm GMT

As an ex-political pro, I can confirm that YouGov are an excellent pollster. I was very suspicious of its methodology when it emerged, but over the decade or so since they have proven a consistently reliable pollster.

Posted by: Gerry Lynch on Thursday, 2 February 2012 at 12:15am GMT

Six out of ten Brits 'reliably/excellently' polled hold the same view as Lord Carey. Thanks for clarifying that.

Posted by: cseitz on Thursday, 2 February 2012 at 2:38pm GMT
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