Saturday, 19 January 2013

opinion

Kelvin Holdsworth offers us 8 Things the Churches Could Learn From the collapse of HMV and Should churches use e-mail? Or indeed blogging?

Valerie Tarico writes for Salon that Religion may not survive the Internet.

Giles Fraser writes in the Church Times about A chance to witness to the vision.

Jody Stowell writes about An Ordinary Radical Event.

Paul Lay writes for History Today about Beyond Belief.

Posted by Peter Owen on Saturday, 19 January 2013 at 11:00am GMT | TrackBack
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Categorised as: Opinion
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One of the more telling assertions in Valerie Tarico's article is this one, "web writers are after eye balls." She ought to ponder this insight some. Marshall McLuhan noted that media are an extension of our central nervous system. The internet merely allows us to extend our senses. As such we may use them to search for accurate information, or to sift evidence in order to confirm our biases. Information, misinformaiton and disinformaiton all travel at the same speed on the net where conspiracy theories flourish and thirve. Why would religion be any less resilient? The Canadian Catholic campiagn she mentions is actually very internet savvy. And that uncle George from Florida,he may close down the conversation with chapter and verse. However, these days he is just as likley to close it down by proclaiming 'It's true. I read it online."

Posted by: Rod Gillis on Sunday, 20 January 2013 at 4:31pm GMT
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