Friday, 29 January 2016

The Columba Declaration and the Scottish Episcopal Church

The Scottish Episcopal Church issued this Statement re Columba Declaration and Growth in Communion – Partnership in Mission Report today.

Statement re Columba Declaration and Growth in Communion – Partnership in Mission Report
January 29, 2016

There was some publicity around Christmastime regarding the publication of the joint Columba Declaration by the Church of Scotland and Church of England. The provincial Faith and Order Board met recently and agreed that a short background note should be issued.

After the publication in 2010 of Our Fellowship in the Gospel by the Joint Study Group of the Church of England and the Church of Scotland, a product of five year’s work, an invitation to join the Joint Study Group was issued to the Scottish Episcopal Church.

The Scottish Episcopal Church was then involved in those new talks up until 2013. At that point, the other two churches expressed a desire to enter into a deeper ecumenical arrangement. The Faith and Order Board considered the matter carefully but did not believe it was appropriate to enter a tripartite “ecumenical” agreement where one of the parties was the Church of England because the Scottish Episcopal Church is already in full communion with the Church of England. The Board suggested instead that the three-way talks might continue, aimed not at forming an ecumenical agreement but rather at enriching common life and mission across the three churches. Therefore, it suggested alternative ways of proceeding on a tripartite basis.

However, the other two churches were keen to move towards some form of ecumenical agreement. It was at this point that the Scottish Episcopal Church ceased to be a full participant in the talks, albeit we were invited to appoint an observer, and duly did so. The then Convener of Inter-Church Relations Committee took on that role with his last involvement being at the final bilateral meeting in late 2014 where a draft of the report was under discussion.

A joint statement by the Church of Scotland and Church of England setting out the Columba Declaration (which forms only the final part of the report) was unexpectedly issued just before Christmas 2015, in response to a press query, and we became aware of this on Christmas Eve. The final form of the full report, however, was embargoed until the 29th January 2016.

Since the issue of that statement, we have been in direct contact with both the Church of Scotland and Church of England and have obtained a copy of the final report Growth in Communion-Partnership in Mission. We have been able to ask a number of initial questions which have been helpfully answered jointly by the Church of Scotland and the Church of England.

In the report it is stated that a response from the Scottish Episcopal Church would be welcomed. The Faith and Order Board at its meeting on 21st January agreed to remit the Scottish Episcopal Church’s detailed examination of the report to the Inter-Church Relations Committee and to ask that Committee to formulate a response for consideration by the Faith and Order Board in September 2016 (which will be the first meeting of the Board after this year’s Church of England Synod and the Church of Scotland General Assembly). This will include consideration of the concerns which the publication of the Columba Declaration, without the benefit of the full report, had prompted before Christmas. The Board believes that publication of Growth in Communion-Partnership in Mission now provides an opportunity to build on the warm relations which the Scottish Episcopal Church already enjoys with the Church of Scotland and very much looks forward to continuing discussions. The Board similarly looks forward to strengthening our relationship and mutual regard with the Church of England.

The report of the Church of Scotland and Church of England Joint Study Group can be read here.

A press release issued today by the Church of Scotland can be read here.

Our earlier coverage of the Columba Declaration is here, here and here.

The Church of England released the Report on the Church of England-Church of Scotland Joint Study Group (GS 2016) today; the Columba Declaration comprises Chapter IV of the report.

The report will be debated at the Church of England’s General Synod on Tuesday 16 February; here is the relevant section of the agenda.

REPORT OF THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND–CHURCH OF SCOTLAND JOINT STUDY GROUP (GS 2016)

10 Presentation under SO 107 by the Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, the Revd Dr Angus Morrison.

The Bishop of Chester (Co-Chair of the Joint Study Group) to move:

11 ‘That this Synod,
(a) welcome the report of the Joint Study Group of the Church of England and the Church of Scotland (annexed to GS 2016) as a significant development in the relationship between the two churches;
(b) approve the Columba Declaration, consisting of mutual Acknowledgements and Commitments, as set out in paragraph 38 of the report; and
(c) request the Council for Christian Unity to oversee the implementation of the Commitments contained in the Columba Declaration and set up the Contact Group proposed by it.’

The Report of the Synod’s Business Committee provides this comment.

Presentation from the Moderator of the Church of Scotland followed by a Debate on the Report of the Church of England – Church of Scotland Joint Study Group

24. The Church of England – Church of Scotland Joint Study Group was set up following the Synod debate on a previous report, Our Fellowship in the Gospel (GS 1792), in July 2010. The document it has produced has four parts, the first setting out important background, the second agreement in faith between the two churches, the third areas where they can grow in partnership for mission and the fourth the ‘Columba Declaration’ of shared Acknowledgements and Commitments. The Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, the Rt Revd Dr Angus Morrison, will give a presentation outlining the significance of the proposed agreement between the churches before the Bishop of Chester, as Co-Chair of the Joint Study Group, introduces the debate.

The Church of Scotland has also issued a press release today: Landmark report on historic Ecumenical partnership plans published.

Posted by Peter Owen on Friday, 29 January 2016 at 2:11pm GMT | TrackBack
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Categorised as: Church of England | General Synod | Scottish Episcopal Church
Comments

Compare
"the warm relations which the Scottish Episcopal Church already enjoys with the Church of Scotland and very much looks forward to continuing discussions"
with
"[t]he Board similarly looks forward to strengthening our relationship and mutual regard with the Church of England."

Hint, hint: the Scottish Episcopal Church's relationship with the Church of England may not be warm, and needs strengthening.

Posted by: Jeremy on Friday, 29 January 2016 at 2:58pm GMT

May I point out the Churches of Scotland and England, the United Reformed Church and the Scottish Episcopal Church have for decades been in communion with the (United) Churches of South India (CSI), Pakistan, North India and Bangladesh. These United Churches are members of the Anglican Communion, World Alliance of Reformed Churches; three of them members of the World Methodist Council. On St Columba's Day 1963 at Iona (14th Centenary of St Columba's landing on Iona) a CSI bishop (Lesslie Newbigin) presided at the Eucharist assisted by Presbyterian Moderators and Anglican Bishops, a bit of a first. Of course the Anglicans had to have a separate Anglicans-only Eucharist as well. Refer Bp Newbigin's Unfinished Business and Lord MacLeod's biography. I have attended moving Iona Community Eucharists at Iona Abbey led by non-Anglicans and Anglicans. As is sometimes pointed out, the British Sovereign relates to the Scottish ecclesiastical establishment in Scotland and the English ecclesiastical establishment in England, also Isle of Man. But then there are those who consider the Ecumenical Movement to be an Anglican plot - see Ian Henderson's Power Without Glory. Apropos the late Mirfield monk Harry Williams' Joy of God, perhaps the angels will reward us for entertaining them so, Heaven where Augustine of Hippo and Pelagius are slapping each other on the back rather than punching each other in the face. Despite all the agreements and orderings, diplomacies and indignations, She, the Holy Spirit, in John Bell's beautiful Enemy of Apathy, cannot be "silenced, captured or restrained".

Posted by: keithmcianwil on Saturday, 30 January 2016 at 12:20am GMT

Sounds like the SEC drew back from a relationship with the CofS on terms that the CofE was seeking. So the latter two moved ahead without them.

Posted by: christopher seitz on Saturday, 30 January 2016 at 7:04am GMT

The Church of England has no need or right, to be 'moving ahead' in Scotland. It is interference.

It needs to get on with the responsibilities it is neglected in England.

Posted by: Laurence Roberts on Monday, 1 February 2016 at 5:15pm GMT
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