Tuesday, 5 December 2017

Dean of St Paul's calls for safeguarding overhaul

David Ison the Dean of St Paul’s has called for a radical overhaul of safeguarding in the Church of England.

This is reported here: Dean of St Paul’s calls for ‘compromised’ bishops to lose responsibility for safeguarding.

The full text of the dean’s remarks can be found here: “Cassock Chasers” and Compromised Clergy. Please read the whole of it.

Posted by Simon Sarmiento on Tuesday, 5 December 2017 at 10:00pm GMT | TrackBack
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Categorised as: Church of England
Comments

I don't think the CofE is getting safeguarding at all right. Indeed, the CofE seems to be making all sorts of mistakes--not acting as it should in some cases, yet acting as it shouldn't in others (e.g., Bishop Bell?).

In other words, the CofE does not seem quite up to the complex task of aiding the victims, punishing the culpable, and respecting the innocent.

Further proofs of this ahead, I suspect.

Posted by: Jeremy on Wednesday, 6 December 2017 at 2:02am GMT

It is now two months since Lord Carlile delivered his report on 6th October. How long, O Lord, how long?
Happy St. Nicholas' Day, he who was a model in the treatment of children. I recall the resurrection of the dismembered boys in the brine tub and the young girls saved from a life of prostitution thanks to good St. Nick's generosity. No wonder they made him, among many other things, Patron Saint of Children.

Posted by: Father David on Wednesday, 6 December 2017 at 7:31am GMT

Father David You keep asking this question. It was answered on a previous thread see here http://www.thinkinganglicans.org.uk/archives/007726.html

Posted by: David Runcorn on Wednesday, 6 December 2017 at 7:53am GMT

I cannot comment on the development of particular structures in the C of E; but with regard to issues such as projection, transference, and self awareness, the Dean David Ison piece is very insightful.

A colleague of mine who was also a trained clinician was of the view that any person offering themseleves for pastoral ministry ought to be prepared to enter into an ongoing psychotherapeutic relationship. The logistics of that would be quite daunting corporately; but the suggestion has lots of merit.

Clinical Pastoral Education can also be a very valuable tool for both the training and continuing education of clergy.

Many clergy make use of 'spiritual advisers' which as a position description can mean many things. Whatever it means, those taking on such an amorphic role need to take care not to reach beyond their competence and be prepared to make referrals to an appropriate professional.

The church can be a real ghetto, the results of which are often tragically predictable.

Posted by: Rod Gillis on Wednesday, 6 December 2017 at 3:00pm GMT

Yes, I do, David Runcorn, but there is no specific answer to the question as to the exact date of publication. It's a bit like PMQs, the Leader of the Opposition asks a question but very rarely does he get a response from the Prime Minister to the actual question he has posed.

Posted by: Father David on Wednesday, 6 December 2017 at 3:55pm GMT
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