Friday, 12 December 2014

Planned interruption of service

The fibre optic cables that provide internet access to our server are going to be replaced tomorrow (Saturday 13 December 2014). The work will start at 15:00 GMT (7am California time, 10am New York time) and will continue until it is done. This is estimated to take 5 hours, but it could be longer.

This site will not be available whilst this work is carried out.

Please do not be worried…

Posted by Peter Owen on Friday, 12 December 2014 at 2:00pm GMT | Comments (0) | TrackBack
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Saturday, 3 May 2014

Thinking Liturgy

Today we are launching a new blog in the Thinking Anglicans family. Called Thinking Liturgy, it will focus on the link between the way that we worship and the social justice that we proclaim. Here on the main TA blog we have focussed largely, though not exclusively, on issues of social justice, and that will continue.

Thinking Liturgy will cover a range of liturgical topics and news, not confined to any particular theological or doctrinal stance or ‘churchmanship’, though it will be largely Anglican and English. It will promote good liturgical practice and understanding — not for its own sake, but looking at the impact liturgy makes on working for the kingdom.

We hope that many of you will read this new blog, and contribute to a lively liturgical discussion. Read more at Thinking Liturgy.

Posted by Simon Kershaw on Saturday, 3 May 2014 at 8:02am BST | Comments (1) | TrackBack
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Friday, 18 January 2013

"awash with misconceptions"

The Anglican Mainstream website carries this editorial (reprinted from New Directions): Special meeting of the House of Laity. It starts:

We are appalled by the news that there is to be a special meeting of the House of Laity of the General Synod to have a vote of no confidence in the Chairman of the House of Laity, Dr Philip Giddings. Dr Giddings spoke up for proper and fair provision for those who in conscience cannot accept the ordination of women to the episcopate. He has been accused of impartiality, a charge not levied against those leaders in other Houses who spoke out firmly in favour of the legislation and indeed in one case against any provision whatsoever for us.

and later continues:

In response to Bishop Jonathan Baker’s fine reflection on the vote in synod the website ‘Thinking Anglicans’ has been awash with misconceptions and in some cases simple untruths. Many commentators have become fixated with the idea that there is a See of Ebbsfleet. Given that Ebbsfleet is a suffragan see of the Archbishop of Canterbury and on the official advert declaring a vacancy in the see it was called the See of Ebbsfleet, one wonders why people are getting so irate. It is of course because they dislike what the See of Ebbsfleet and indeed the other Catholic sees stand for. They dislike the sense of coherence around a bishop that has grown up in our constituency. They cannot understand the world in which we operate, supporting one another and meeting together, because we share a common faith and a common vision. [emphasis added]

Unlike the Anglican Mainstream website, we are open for comments.

Posted by Peter Owen on Friday, 18 January 2013 at 10:17am GMT | Comments (20) | TrackBack
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Categorised as: About Thinking Anglicans | Church of England | General Synod

Friday, 13 July 2012

Revision of Clause 5(1)(c)

On Monday the General Synod voted to adjourn the debate on Final Aproval of the Bishops and Priests (Consecration and Ordination of Women) Measure to enable the House of Bishops to reconsider the new clause 5(1)(c) that the House had inserted.

We propose to conduct a discussion here on Thinking Anglicans with the aim of making one or more suggestions to the House on the form that reconsideration might take. In order to make this as constructive, helpful and eirenic as possible, we will conduct this in a more formal way than we normally do.

  • Discussion will begin with a post from one or more guest contributors
  • Commenting will as now be subject to moderation, but we will more strictly enforce the rules on relevance, ad hominem comment (none allowed) and so on. ‘Relevance’ means keeping to this particular topic: constructively discussing possible texts that would satisfy the reference back to the HoB from the Synod, i.e., we are solely concerned with revision, removal, expansion, replacement etc of clause 5(1)(c).
  • We hope that various viewpoints will be offered, and we expect all to be respected. However, the purpose of the discussion is to make the draft Measure more likely to gain Final Approval at the General Synod, and more likely to gain parliamentary approval.

We firmly believe and hope that a site named ‘Thinking Anglicans’ can and should be a place for this sort of debate: one of high quality, and high regard for other participants, as well as for those who are not participating, whether an individual agrees with them or not.

We will introduce this debate shortly.

Simon, Simon and Peter

Posted by Simon Kershaw on Friday, 13 July 2012 at 7:46am BST | Comments (15) | TrackBack
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Categorised as: About Thinking Anglicans | Church of England

Tuesday, 12 June 2012

Planned interruption of service

On Wednesday morning between the hours of 9 am and 1 pm (London time) there will be a planned interruption of service from this website. This is due to essential maintenance being performed by the Internet Service Provider to which our server is connected.

Please do not be worried….

Posted by Simon Sarmiento on Tuesday, 12 June 2012 at 8:19pm BST | Comments (3) | TrackBack
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Saturday, 24 March 2012

Normal service resumed

We have now resolved the problems with the TA server (installing new hardware and late nights getting the software running properly on it!).

Commenting has now been re-enabled.

Simon K
(TA techie)

Posted by Simon Kershaw on Saturday, 24 March 2012 at 3:42pm GMT | Comments (22) | TrackBack
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Friday, 23 March 2012

Reduced service

We are experiencing a few technical difficulties with the Thinking Anglicans server. Unfortunately this means that it is not currently possible to add comments to the site. We are working to restore normal service and will do so as soon as possible.

Posted by Simon Kershaw on Friday, 23 March 2012 at 9:35am GMT | Comments (1) | TrackBack
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Friday, 12 November 2010

About Comments

The editors of Thinking Anglicans (Simon S, Peter and Simon K) have recently discussed the question of comments on TA, and we are agreed that we should encourage ‘good commenting’. WIth that in mind, I am republishing a post I made in June 2007

We have noticed an increasing tendency by some commenters to make ad hominem or derogatory comments about other people — sometimes about other commenters and perhaps more often about people in the news.

We want discussions here to be conducted in a spirit of Christian charity and we are going to take a strong line on this. We will not approve comments that include ad hominem remarks. Comments on someone else should concentrate on their words or deeds. People should be accorded their proper names and/or titles, not a pretend or derogatory name or sarcastic title preferred by the commenter. Please note that this applies to people on all sides of discussions.

Secondly, we reiterate a plea we made a year ago: ‘please consider seriously using your own name, rather than a pseudonym. While we do not, at this time, intend to make this a requirement, we do wish to strongly encourage the use of real names.’

We hope that if commenters were to respond in this spirit then discussions would be better, the level of debate would be higher, and we would be doing a little more to bring about the kingdom of God.

Posted by Simon Kershaw on Friday, 12 November 2010 at 9:51pm GMT | Comments (23) | TrackBack
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Monday, 20 October 2008

Our RSS feeds

At Thinking Anglicans readers sometimes ask us how they can know when there are new articles or new comments. One way, of course, is to visit the site and have a look. But that is not very convenient, particularly if you are looking for new comments on an article published sometime ago (such as the one on the Church Representation Rules 2006 which is still attracting comments).

A more convenient way is to use our RSS* feeds. These feed new content from our site to, for example, a website which you can then check from time to time for updates. We have two.

for this site
for comments on this site

If you click on these links you will be taken to a list of links to recent articles or comments with some or all of the actual text. What’s most convenient though is to subscribe to our feeds with an RSS reader such as Bloglines. There’s also Live Bookmarks in the Firefox browser and the News & Blogs feature in the Thunderbird email program.

How to subscribe to our feeds
We’ve made it easy for you to subscribe to our feeds. Follow the link to one of our feeds and click on the “Subscribe Now” button at the top. By default you will be subscribed using Bloglines. Then do the same for the other feed. Then whenever you visit the Bloglines website you will be able to see our latest articles and comments.

If you want to try other readers there is a short drop-down list above our “Subscribe Now” button or a longer list here.

*You don’t need to know what RSS stands for to use the feeds, but it is “Really Simple Syndication”.

Posted by Peter Owen on Monday, 20 October 2008 at 4:38pm BST | Comments (3) | TrackBack
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Tuesday, 5 June 2007

about comments (again)

We have noticed an increasing tendency by some commenters to make ad hominem or derogatory comments about other people — sometimes about other commenters and perhaps more often about people in the news.

We want discussions here to be conducted in a spirit of Christian charity and we are going to take a strong line on this. We will not approve comments that include ad hominem remarks. Comments on someone else should concentrate on their words or deeds. People should be accorded their proper names and/or titles, not a pretend or derogatory name or sarcastic title preferred by the commenter. Please note that this applies to people on all sides of discussions.

Secondly, we reiterate a plea we made a year ago: ‘please consider seriously using your own name, rather than a pseudonym. While we do not, at this time, intend to make this a requirement, we do wish to strongly encourage the use of real names.’

Finally, a reminder about comment-length: ‘a few people have sometimes written very long comments that really are essays in their own right, rather than being comments on the original article, or direct responses to previous comments. We have therefore decided to introduce a length limit of 400 words per comment, with immediate effect. Longer comments than that will in future quite probably not be published. If you still want to write such essays, we suggest that you set up your own blog, and you will be very welcome to then link to them in the comments here.’

Posted by Simon Kershaw on Tuesday, 5 June 2007 at 2:48pm BST | Comments (48) | TrackBack
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Sunday, 23 July 2006

about comments

We have two announcements to make to those who comment here:

First, if you are not already doing so, please consider seriously using your own name, rather than a pseudonym. While we do not, at this time, intend to make this a requirement, we do wish to strongly encourage the use of real names.

Second, a few people have sometimes written very long comments that really are essays in their own right, rather than being comments on the original article, or direct responses to previous comments. We have therefore decided to introduce a length limit of 400 words per comment, with immediate effect. Longer comments than that will in future quite probably not be published. If you still want to write such essays, we suggest that you set up your own blog, and you will be very welcome to then link to them in the comments here.

We hope that this will all lead to more and better comments.

Posted by Simon Sarmiento on Sunday, 23 July 2006 at 11:16pm BST | Comments (39) | TrackBack
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Thursday, 11 August 2005

service announcement

We apologise to our users, and particularly those who comment, for the recent service disruption here. The articles posted since last Saturday have had to be restored manually. We regret however that it will not be possible to restore the comments made from last Saturday until this morning, including any made during that period to older articles.

Posted by Simon Sarmiento on Thursday, 11 August 2005 at 5:31pm BST | Comments (4)
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Saturday, 6 December 2003

Partaking or plotting?

Two weeks ago, the Church Times paper edition’s web page contained an article by Sarah Meyrick, about various new web-based British church organizations, which mentioned Thinking Anglicans. This is now on the CT website.
To read the whole article, follow this link and scroll down to Partaking or plotting?
The portion about Thinking Anglicans is reproduced below.
As Sarah concludes:

All these websites give people at the grassroots a chance to track events as they unfold, and to explore tricky issues with an audience far wider than could have been dreamt of in pre-web days. For the movers and shakers, they are a means of taking the temperature of the Anglican Church at a time of turmoil.
At its best, the internet provides a way of fostering community and broadening the horizons of its users; at its worst, it allows people to become narrower in outlook and to plot damage. I suspect the outcome in this case lies in how much - if at all - the different networks communicate with each other.

So here are links to the other sites she mentions:
www.inclusivechurch.net
www.anglican-mainstream.net
www.fulcrum-anglican.org.uk
www.biblicalliberal.com

Extract from Partaking or plotting?

Sarah Meyrick on church groups that campaign on the web

…Meanwhile, www.thinkinganglicans.org.uk has taken a different approach, by creating a discussion forum, intended for “tolerant, thoughtful and understanding exploration”. Visitors post their views through weblogs or “blogs” - comments on news and issues - with a gentle lead from the founders. This is a clean site, which owes much to the well-established www.anglicansonline.org.

Simon Sarmiento, one of the founders, says blogging is a uniquely powerful tool of communication (see below). “We wanted to give people the chance to share their opinions,” he says. “With blogging, all you need is a computer and a phone.” The site, which began life in August, now registers 500 page impressions a day.

Posted by Simon Sarmiento on Saturday, 6 December 2003 at 9:26am GMT | Comments (3) | TrackBack
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Thursday, 6 November 2003

About News reporting

I shall now revert to posting my near-daily News updates on my personal blog rather than here on TA.

The “really major events” of the primates meeting and the New Hampshire consecration have now passed, and the level of press activity is reducing rapidly.

Simon Sarmiento

Posted by Simon Sarmiento on Thursday, 6 November 2003 at 9:22am GMT | Comments (1) | TrackBack
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Categorised as: About Thinking Anglicans | News

Monday, 13 October 2003

About News reporting

Generally, I post near-daily News updates to my personal blog rather than on here. But really major events (NEAC was a recent example) are reported here on TA.
Clearly the upcoming Primates Meeting is also a really major event. So during this week, I will post about that on here, but any other routine news stories will still be on my personal blog.
Simon Sarmiento

Posted by Simon Sarmiento on Monday, 13 October 2003 at 3:33pm BST | TrackBack
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Categorised as: About Thinking Anglicans | News

Saturday, 9 August 2003

Who we are

Thinking Anglicans is initially the work of three people. We have invited a number of others to join us and will list them here in due course.

Simon Kershaw was born in Warwickshire, read Physics at Wadham College, Oxford, and since then has worked in the computer software industry for a variety of companies.
Married with two children, he now lives in St Ives near Cambridge. He has contributed to a number of publications, including A Companion to Common Worship, vol 1 (SPCK 2001, edited by Professor Paul Bradshaw), Come to the Feast (Canterbury Press 2001, by Gill Ambrose and Simon Kershaw), and Exciting Holiness, second edition (Canterbury Press 2003).

Simon Sarmiento was born in Sheffield and graduated in Industrial Management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is now retired from a major British software company, where he served for a decade as personnel director and later as head of internal IT.
Married with four grown-up children, he worked in the USA for a while, and has lived in St Albans Hertfordshire since 1971. He worships at the Cathedral and Abbey Church of Saint Alban. He is part of the team that publishes Anglicans Online and is a consultant to Church House Publishing.

Peter Owen was born in Southend-on-Sea, read Mathematical Physics at Birmingham University and has a DPhil in Astrophysics from Sussex University. He taught mathematics in higher education for thirty years before taking early retirement in 2000.
He lives in the suburbs of Liverpool and is a worshipper and former churchwarden at St Luke’s Church in Crosby. He is a part of the team that publishes Anglicans Online. Outside the church, he is chair of the (NHS) Sefton Local Research Ethics Committee. He was a member of General Synod from 1995 to 2005.

David Walker was born in Lancashire, brought up in Yorkshire, studied and researched in Mathematics at Kings College, Cambridge until being accepted as a Church of England ordinand by the Bishop of Ely in early 1980. Having studied Theology at Birmingham under David Ford and Frances Young, he then spent 17 years in parochial and industrial chaplaincy ministry in the Diocese of Sheffield. In November 2000, he became Bishop of Dudley in the Diocese of Worcester. Sue (who teaches at a pupil referral unit) and he have two teenage children, three cats and three ferrets. They are both Franciscan tertiaries. He has an interest in social policy and governance issues and is active in various housing charities.

Paul Roberts is vicar of two parishes in Bristol. He has taught liturgy and doctrine at Trinity College, Bristol and was a founder of Resonance, an alternative worship collective. He also co-hosts www.alternativeworship.org. He is a member of the General Synod.

Tom Ambrose studied Arts, then Geology, at Sheffield University. The fruits of his research in Northern Spain contributed to Spanish Geological Survey maps. He trained for ordination at Emmanuel College Cambridge and Westcott House. After six years in parishes in Newcastle Diocese he returned to Cambridgeshire. For 6 years he was Director of Communications for the Diocese of Ely, and joined the Churches Advertising Network.
He is married to Gill, and they have two grown up children. Gill is editor of Roots, a member of General Synod and the Liturgical Commission, and is the author of books on Children’s and Youth work. With Simon Kershaw she wrote Come to the Feast (Canterbury Press 2001, by Gill Ambrose and Simon Kershaw).

Posted by Simon Sarmiento on Saturday, 9 August 2003 at 8:00pm BST | Comments (8) | TrackBack
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Justice and Spirituality: proclaiming the kingdom of God

Thinking Anglicans is a website for thoughtful contributions to the proclamation of the gospel message. Here writers reflect on what it means to be a Christian, particularly in Britain today.

Thinking Anglicans will actively report news, events and documents that affect church people, and will comment on them from a liberal Christian perspective.

Thinking Anglicans proclaims a tolerant, progressive and compassionate Christian spirituality, in which justice is central to the proclamation of the good news of the kingdom of God. Our spirituality must engage with the world, and be consistent with the scientific and philosophical understanding on which our modern world is based. It must address the changes which science and technology have brought into our lives.

Thinking Anglicans takes the form of weblogs (or ‘blogs’) in which writers place their thoughts in public for all to read. We each take responsibility for our own words. There is no central definition or declaration of faith to which contributors must subscribe, although most of our writers are active Christians in communion with the see of Canterbury. Rather there is a range of opinions, which contributes to debate, and is legitimate diversity within the Christian faith. The site will be updated frequently, with regular contributions from our team of writers, commenting on news events and exploring wider issues and deeper meanings.

Thinking Anglicans is a focal point where you can find the words of informed contributors to the contemporary understanding of Christian faith, as well as the views of ordinary ‘Anglicans in the pew’. In a world where the voices of fundamentalism and conservatism are frequently heard, Thinking Anglicans is a place for a tolerant, thoughtful and understanding exploration of Christian faith. We hope this shared witness of the vision of God’s kingdom in the world will help and encourage both Christians and others.

Posted by Simon Kershaw on Saturday, 9 August 2003 at 7:00pm BST | Comments (5) | TrackBack
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