Comments: Pittsburgh: a name change and an appeal

Hurrah for this determination on the part of the truly Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh to defend the property of the Episcopal Church - as defined by His Honour Judge Joseph James on October 6, 2009. To take any other course would be to give in to the hubris of ACNA and others who deny the theological integrity of TEC, in its prophetic movement to Ordain and offer Blessings to LGBT members of the Episcopal Church in the USA.

Perhaps the culture of legislation may yet persuade the dissenters not to attempt any further misappropriation of the dignity and property of mainline Episcopalian Communities.
Legal proceedings are mightily expensive, as both TEC and the Dissenters will by now be aware. This money could well have been spent on the Mission of The Gospel. Let's hope the New Puritans learn from all of this.

Posted by Father Ron Smith at Friday, 30 October 2009 at 12:11am GMT

Amazing. I hope all will recall Bishop Duncan's performance at Dar-es-Salaam condemning the lawsuits. The message then was Christians don't sue Christians. So what is the message now? Will the argument be that Bishop Duncan can sue TEC because TEC isn't Christian? When will the primates wake up and realize they've been had. Is it time for them to read the Secret Global South Memo and learn the real agenda. It is about the property. It was always about the property. The hands of innocent and suffering Reverend Mr. Duncan are just as dirty, when it comes to holding onto the cash as any one in TEC, and maybe even dirtier. Unlike Duncan, TEC never claimed to be pure.

Posted by EmilyH at Friday, 30 October 2009 at 12:51am GMT

xDuncan's mouthpiece, Millard: "a minority of our former parishes, which now claim to be a diocese affiliated with the Episcopal Church"

Give me a break: "claim to be"?!

An *unconstitutional* vote, even if by a "majority", remains unconstitutional. God bless TEC!

Posted by JCF at Friday, 30 October 2009 at 1:52am GMT

"An *unconstitutional* vote, even if by a 'majority', remains unconstitutional."

Here's what bothers me: aren't these the same good, "orthodox" folks who keep telling us you can't discern truth by majority vote?

And yet . . .

Well, why go on. Only a fool wouldn't see it.

Posted by MarkBrunson at Friday, 30 October 2009 at 8:01am GMT

I thought that the definition of what constitutes Anglican is that one is recognised by and in communion with the Archbishop (See) of Canterbury. The name change seems somewhat premature, even presumptuous.

Posted by Roger Antell at Friday, 30 October 2009 at 10:10am GMT

"I thought that the definition of what constitutes Anglican is that one is recognised by and in communion with the Archbishop (See) of Canterbury."

Oh, not here in the States! We have all sorts of erstwhile and would-be "Anglican" groups who wouldn't touch Canterbury with a ten foot virge.

Posted by BillyD at Friday, 30 October 2009 at 11:50am GMT

"Will the argument be that Bishop Duncan can sue TEC because TEC isn't Christian?"

Well, given that the Jerusalem Declaration reiterates their often stated belief that TEC is apostate, preaching a "different Gospel", and selling out to the world, I'd say the answer to this is "yes".

Posted by Ford Elms at Friday, 30 October 2009 at 1:11pm GMT

Gives a whole new meaning to the local (American) football team....The Pittsburgh Stealers.

Posted by choirboyfromhell at Friday, 30 October 2009 at 1:31pm GMT

"I thought that the definition of what constitutes Anglican is that one is recognised by and in communion with the Archbishop (See) of Canterbury. The name change seems somewhat premature, even presumptuous."

Sorry, but this is classic C of E thinking.

In the U.S., the brand "Anglican" fell somewhat out of use in the 1780s. That's when the American church that broke from C of E began to call itself "Episcopal" instead. At that time, anything that smacked too much of England was not helpful to the marketing effort.

As a result, in the U.S., pretty much anyone who wants to can call themselves "Anglican." And lots of splinter groups have done so, for decades. Who or what is going to stop them? Certainly not the fact that they don't get once-a-decade invitations.

What the Pittsburgh schismatics could not do, legally, was go by the name of another organization ("Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh"). So they have now abandoned that name in order to avoid further liability.

Posted by Jeremy at Friday, 30 October 2009 at 1:57pm GMT

From the newspaper link:

Rev. Millard said the Anglican diocese thought an equitable split would involve "sharing assets, not winner-takes-all."

"That just seems manifestly unfair," he said.

****************************

BWAHAHAHAHAHA!!!! They really have no self-awareness, do they?

My mother always told me that life wasn't fair---but it's good to see that, on occasion, people really DO get what they deserve. ;-)

Posted by Doxy at Friday, 30 October 2009 at 5:43pm GMT

So - in some folk theology sort of way - do flat earth beliefs lead to thieving? Insofar as flat earth beliefs rely on egregiously Ends-Justify-Means ethics?

Only xDuncan and his companions know; and even then the only sure thing is that God is antigay, period. Which means you can do anything you like to queer folks, including hostile takeover bids and outright stealing of assets or resources.

It is transparently self-serving, all this conservative Duncan-esque Anglican realignment. His god comes across way too small, too mean, too shifty-eyed when it comes to other peoples' family silver and gold. This deity may indeed be an all too sadly familiar sort of ancient near eastern divinity; but not just the one that we believe was incarnated in Jesus of Nazareth. xDuncan cannot actually tell between YHWH and the Ba'alim. Alas. Lord have mercy.

Posted by drdanfee at Friday, 30 October 2009 at 6:39pm GMT
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