Comments: Christmas opinions

Nothing like a scolding sermon for Christmas, which is what the Archbishop of York's sermon seems to me.

Posted by Grandmère Mimi at Sunday, 27 December 2009 at 10:14pm GMT

CHRIST WAITING TO FIND ROOM. Archbishop of York's Christmas Day Sermon 2009.And it makes me wonder what the church is going to do about it. Argue about homosexuality? or tell the world the good news of Jesus Christ? because Good News is always worth repeating - yet politics and arguing makes the news and it is getting in the way. Hey everyone Jesus is alive! rejoice and tell.

Posted by Davis Mac-Iyalla at Monday, 28 December 2009 at 9:28am GMT

Was the Lord of York actually preaching from the Church or from the SKY!

Posted by Leonardo Ricardo at Monday, 28 December 2009 at 3:06pm GMT

I'm sure that the Archbishop of York has the best of intentions when speaking about asylum seekers.

One group he does not mention, however, and who should be foremest in his mind at the moment, are the asylum seekers who come to the UK fleeing from persecution on the basis of their sexual orientation. A good number of them are African and Anglican - people who have been completely rejected as lepers by both their governments and our, oops, their Church.

Posted by Fr Mark at Monday, 28 December 2009 at 7:41pm GMT

Davis Mac-Iyalla, as usual, and as one more vulnerable in the LGBT debate, has pointed to the fact that; as Christ is in the intimate lives of all who share in his humanity, the LGBT community is still waiting to find its place in the Body of Christ, the Church.

Posted by Father Ron Smith at Monday, 28 December 2009 at 8:37pm GMT

I find it a bit vexed to read Rowan Williams sermon without getting quite a few twinges of Tin Ear Syndrome. How very, very odd to read a valorization of receiving, growing, learning as lifelong axes of God at work, Emmanuel; in view of RW being so very blatently poor at relating to progressive Anglican believers in nearly any change instance you wish to hold up for careful scrutiny. Yet he passes smoothly by, un-twinged, when it comes to Anglican right-wing stubborn positions which mainly proclaim: There is nothing new under the sun which revolves around our flat earth when it comes to those pesky queer folks and/or to women called by God to be incarnations of Spirit not just handy Womens Guild incubators for Male Power.

Nice to have RW calling for learning, growth, change as lifelong spiritual pathway features. Rather a struggle to think he means it. Perhaps our pending New Year 2010 will actually see RW putting his newly proclaimed appreciations of learning and change into some effective big tent Anglican welcome to progressive Anglican believers?

RW preaches, We cannot do without you progressives, but he never really acts as if he means what he says. Can RW really value any of the hot button but reasonable changes in church life such believers would frankly base on a decent Anglican big tent global mix of reason, modern knowledge, scripture, tradition?

Alas, RW roars and thrashes around now like an big old Canterbury Rex Tyrannosaurus predator, lamenting nearly every single new ecological and evolutionary change he says can make no fair sense to his keen backwards mind. Roar on, CRT. If you wish to valorize a believer mind and heart, needing to be more receptive to learning, growth, change ... why, dear fellow, dear brother, look to yourself, please?

Posted by drdanfee at Monday, 28 December 2009 at 11:36pm GMT

The link to Archbishop John Sentamu's sermon no longer works. I get "Page not found". I wonder why the sermon was removed. Neither is the sermon posted at the website of the Diocese of York.

Posted by Grandmère Mimi at Tuesday, 29 December 2009 at 10:09pm GMT

Mimi
That is odd, I have reported it to Bishopthorpe, and maybe it will get fixed.

Posted by Simon Sarmiento at Tuesday, 29 December 2009 at 11:42pm GMT
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