Comments: Five Minutes with the Pope

I love all of both of them, at least I love all of both of them until you get to the happy contented teenagers - there is no such thing as a happy contented teenager of any orientation ;)

Posted by Rosemary Hannah at Monday, 13 September 2010 at 9:30am BST

Yes, these are terrific pieces !

Posted by Laurence Roberts at Monday, 13 September 2010 at 2:40pm BST

Thank you both for expressing more politely what I would like to say to Benedict.

Posted by Rebecca Lyman at Monday, 13 September 2010 at 4:14pm BST

Toujours la politess, Rebecca !

Posted by Laurence Roberts at Monday, 13 September 2010 at 4:42pm BST

Two wonderful, deeply spiritual and yet humanely accessible accounts of what 2 different people might have to say to Pope Benedict. Lucy, through her experience of priestly ministry - despite the sometime opposition from her own and the Roman Catholic Church - has experienced the reality of being with God-in-Christ at the altar. This she has taken with her in her ministry to those who visit St. Paul's Cathedral seeking something of Christ's loving concern for all people.

Diarmid expresses most beautifully what it might be like for a single person - unable to form an intimate relationship with someone of the opposite gender - to find love and acceptance from a person of one's own sex; to be an intentional, loving and life-time companion. Pope Benedict, with his personal secretary-companion, may have some idea of what Diarmid is talking about. Also, he may resonate with the known partnership of John Henry Newman with his dearest companion, and fellow cleric, Fr. Ambrose.
Maybe, LOVE will find a way of communication!

Posted by Father Ron Smith at Monday, 13 September 2010 at 10:30pm BST

As a Catholic I would like to thank him for the wonderful job he does as Vicar of Christ, kiss his ring and ask his blessing. If I was courageous I would ask why he does not employ excommunication on a greater scale.

Posted by Robert Ian Williams at Monday, 13 September 2010 at 10:36pm BST

Wow super nice to have both musings, right out in the public media opens as it were. Don't much expect His Holiness with the due emphasis on HIS ... to bother much. The woman and that gay couple are either ... subservient and invisible, or just plain disobedient renegades to be brought ever so firmly, firmly, firmly, right into quite speechless line. Per the pope's going preachments, each offends by existing, let alone by having the chuchtzpa to witness about it.

A visit's a visit's a visit. Thing about Newman is, he was exemplary enough to repent of having been Anglican. And, of course, there is his noted abstention from anything we could dare to call, sexy. Two pillars, all rock hard salt.

Who was it, said: Nothing so disgusting and deeply abhorrent to the religious mind, as an ordinary human being?

Posted by drdanfee at Tuesday, 14 September 2010 at 12:36am BST

If I had five minutes with him at the Vatican I would take a number of brochures about visiting the Vatican and ask him if he could change his travel plans for the week.

If I was to meet him here I wouldn't even leave the house to the roadside if he went this way.

Posted by Pluralist at Tuesday, 14 September 2010 at 1:46am BST

"Given my five minutes with Pope Benedict, I would ask him if he’s ever spent any time with a gay couple."

And then, if invited for breakfast, I would love to turn across the dining table and ask Msgr. Georg Ganschwein the same question! ;-)

[@RIW: "If I was courageous I would ask why he does not employ excommunication on a greater scale."

Have you never heard the lovely metaphorical saying, Robert Ian, that when you point a finger, 3 fingers point back at YOU?]

Posted by JCF at Tuesday, 14 September 2010 at 2:58am BST

To RIW: now, now, that sounds like the pharisees and scribes in last Sunday's Gospel: This fellow welcomes sinners and eats with them. (or perhaps would that it were more applicable to the Pope...)

Posted by Sara MacVane at Tuesday, 14 September 2010 at 6:42am BST

I wouldn't waste five minutes of breath on the old whitewashed tomb.

Posted by MarkBrunson at Tuesday, 14 September 2010 at 9:04am BST

"Pope Benedict, with his personal secretary-companion, may have some idea of what Diarmid is talking about."

Pictures of them together always remind me of Mr. Burns and Smithers.

Posted by Laurence at Tuesday, 14 September 2010 at 9:13am BST

Considering all the alarming news coming out of Belgium, I don't think I'd want to spend any time with him at all.

Posted by Counterlight at Tuesday, 14 September 2010 at 11:56am BST

Will "the tablet" print and mail these to the Pope, with a translation?

Maybe they could start a new series called 5 minutes with the ABC.

Posted by Cynthia Gilliatt at Tuesday, 14 September 2010 at 6:20pm BST

But excommunication is an act of love. The opposite of love is not hate but indifference. To excommunicate a person is to warn them that they are in peril of their souls.

Posted by Robert Ian Williams at Tuesday, 14 September 2010 at 8:15pm BST

"I am being caught up in the eschatological foretaste of the heavenly banquet." Lucy Winkett

Serious question : what does this sentence mean? Can someone paraphrase in simple English please. Thank you in advance.

Posted by Laurence C. at Tuesday, 14 September 2010 at 9:21pm BST

"But excommunication is an act of love ... To excommunicate a person is to warn them that they are in peril of their souls."

Robert Ian, I addressed this on a thread (nearby) below.

The logical extension of this, is that to *burn someone at the stake* is then the greatest "act of love" of all (Temporal fire, to warn/burn them away from eternal hellfire!)

It is (in the immortal words of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer") ***INSANE TROLL LOGIC***. Anathema!

Posted by JCF at Wednesday, 15 September 2010 at 12:06am BST

@Lawrence: I think that Canon Winkett meant to say

"I am (now) being caught up in a foretaste of the eschatological heavenly banquet."

Slightly tweaked, I believe that the faith profession is clear, Christian and Catholic.

Posted by JCF at Wednesday, 15 September 2010 at 12:10am BST

RIW
"But excommunication is an act of love."

Of course! I forgot!
But it is true that, sadly, it doesn't work for everyone because they keep endangering their mortal souls and don't repent and come back into teh fold.
So I think we should extend this faultless reasoning of how love is best expressed and re-instate the Inquisition.
After all, a bit of loving torture is a much better "non-punishment" than excommunication to ensure that a mortal soul is saved.

If I didn't have amazingly intelligent, thoughtful and deeply faithful Catholic friends your testimony here could put me right off your church.

Posted by Erika Baker at Wednesday, 15 September 2010 at 9:23am BST

"But excommunication is an act of love. The opposite of love is not hate but indifference. To excommunicate a person is to warn them that they are in peril of their souls."

That makes as much sense as Archbishop of Atlanta banning altar girls as an answer to the priest pedophile problem ten years ago.

http://www.georgiabulletin.org/local/2004/01/01/Look_Back_At_2003/

Wow. Unbelievable. Are you for real RIW?

No wonder they're closing churches left and right in my hometown.

Posted by evensongjunkie at Wednesday, 15 September 2010 at 1:08pm BST

Oh, I forgot...if excommunication is an act of love, and suppose Erika and JCF are correct, then ABORTION would be the greatest act of love ALTOGETHER!!!!!

What flavor Kool-Aid RIW?????

Posted by evensongjunkie at Wednesday, 15 September 2010 at 1:13pm BST

Being a Catholic dissident is perhaps a greater act of love than excommunication. This article is five years old, but timely.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A57560-2005Apr15.html

Posted by Rod Gillis at Wednesday, 15 September 2010 at 4:33pm BST

I rarely post on this site, although I read it frequently, since I was in fact part of the Roman Catholic church until about five years ago.

But let me use that experience, including many serious conversations with priests and even a few bishops, to say that excommunication is an act of exhibitionism, private counseling and admonition can be an act of love.

Posted by Gene O'Grady at Wednesday, 15 September 2010 at 7:01pm BST

It's a long time since I felt this glad to be protestant & Arminian, and to know 'Church' or minister how ever high up (in the RC or any other denomination) can truly 'excommunicate' from the true Church,from the heart of God.

At the end of the day very little is essential to the journey -- not bishops, ministers, bread and wine, books, doctrines / notions.

Posted by Laurence Roberts at Wednesday, 15 September 2010 at 7:51pm BST
Post a comment









Remember personal info?






Please note that comments are limited to 400 words. Comments that are longer than 400 words will not be approved.

Cookies are used to remember your personal information between visits to the site. This information is stored on your computer and used to refill the text boxes on your next visit. Any cookie is deleted if you select 'No'. By ticking 'Yes' you agree to this use of a cookie by this site. No third-party cookies are used, and cookies are not used for analytical, advertising, or other purposes.