Comments: General Synod election results

I don't know what the candidates' list looked like in Oxford Diocese - but I see that one of the last Synod's more prominent and vocal members, Canon Chris Sugden has not been returned.

Posted by Jeremy Pemberton at Wednesday, 13 October 2010 at 7:22am BST

No sign of Anglican Mainstream's Chris Sugden in the Oxford diocese results. Maybe he didn't stand for re-election.

Posted by Laurence C. at Wednesday, 13 October 2010 at 10:15am BST

Dr Sugden most definitely did stand for re-election in Oxford, and was not returned.

Posted by Hannah at Wednesday, 13 October 2010 at 12:47pm BST

The "balance" in London House of Clergy seems much as before despite a few new faces. Fr Jonathan Clark ( Aff Cath) didnt get on but Clare Herbert who was at college with me, and more or less next door when I was in Bloomsbury did. Dont know about the laity. Good to see Mary Johnston and John Ward returned, and Mary pears from my old parish in Bedford Park on for the Abps Council.

Posted by Perry Butler at Wednesday, 13 October 2010 at 3:27pm BST

Chris Sugden will be greatly missed,for sure.

Posted by Laurence Roberts at Wednesday, 13 October 2010 at 4:23pm BST

Missed? Miffed, more like!!

Posted by Jeremy Pemberton at Wednesday, 13 October 2010 at 11:29pm BST

He will be missed, as will those from the Catholic wing who have not been re-elected. It is important that GS is balanced and represents all traditions of the church

Posted by Daniel D at Thursday, 14 October 2010 at 7:47am BST

"I see that one of the last Synod's more prominent and vocal members, Canon Chris Sugden has not been returned." - Jeremy Pemberton -

Then hear what the Spirit is saying to The Church!
One might rejoice at the fact that Mr. Sugden's
grand-standing on the issue of sexuality was one of the reasons his fellow clergy and laity did not consider him suitable to represent either them
or fellow Anglicans in the world at large.

Posted by Father Ron Smith at Thursday, 14 October 2010 at 9:07am BST

Daniel, I couldn't agree more. GS members should represent the people who elect them (and those electors in turn their parishes). Those didn't want to have these people represent them any more. That is balance.

Sadly for the people who were not elected they did not have enough support to get on - despite there being nine places, and a voting system that must favour the representation of minorities, even if they come in eight or ninth. That must tell us something.

Posted by Jeremy Pemberton at Thursday, 14 October 2010 at 10:27am BST

I think it interesting that the more 'vocal' candidates from all traditions seem to be losing out. Revd. Rose Hudson-Wilkin failed to get on in London, Chris Sugden in Oxford, I'm sure there's more.

Whether this leads to a more co-operative synod and less of the posturing remains to be seen. One can only watch and pray.

Posted by tommiaquinas at Thursday, 14 October 2010 at 12:03pm BST

I would say the Church is Catholic rather than this 'wing' or that. That is the Creed.

Posted by Laurence Roberts at Thursday, 14 October 2010 at 3:02pm BST

Neither Tim Cox (Blackburn) nor John Hartley (Bradford) seem to have been re-elected.

Posted by Sue Slater at Thursday, 14 October 2010 at 5:35pm BST

What's the significance of the loss of Messrs Cox and Hartley? General view is that conservative catholic laity seem to be being relected, but fewer clergy of that constituency. A good number of women clergy and a lot of people in the top half of the alphabet (see Ely and Oxford clergy) - I wonder if there is a research project to be done on whether one puts higher preferences for those higher up the list? (And I know that Liverpool didn't have theirs in alphabetical order).

Discuss.

Posted by Wilf at Thursday, 14 October 2010 at 7:26pm BST

What's the significance of the loss of Messrs Cox and Hartley?

They were both very vocal members of General Synod, and had served for at least two terms. Tim (a district councillor in Blackpool)was only 20 when first elected to GS and promoted a Private Members' Motion for bibles to be readily available in every church. Is the Simon Cox (one of the clergy elected for Blackburn) Tim Cox's father, by any chance? John, a mathematician, was very knowledgeable about standing orders, and sang and played the piano for Synod worship. I haven't checked the voting record, but believe they may both have voted conservatively, from the Catholic and Evangelical wings respectively.

Posted by Sue Slater at Thursday, 14 October 2010 at 10:57pm BST

'It is important that GS is balanced and represents all traditions of the church'

- Posted by: Daniel D on Thursday -

Have you thought, Daniel, that GS may just be as balanced as could be - representatively. Except, perhaps, in the proportionate representation of women in the Church? This might be a cause for alarm - rather than the issue of party politics.

Posted by Father Ron Smith at Friday, 15 October 2010 at 9:15am BST

Yes, Perry Butler. The women certainly seemed to get their act together in London and are very well represented. I assume that the men who lost out, but who are vocal supporters of women's ministry will be rejoicing in this regard. Replaced by women. Rejoicing too, in the case of the ambitious ones, that for a generation it will be the girls who get the hats rather than them!

Wasn't it the Speaker of the House of Commons who said, rather offensively, that we don't want another middle aged white man?

Posted by Neil at Friday, 15 October 2010 at 9:54am BST

Wilf,

I'm interested generally as to whether voters might be more likely to vote for candidates who come nearer the top of the alphabetical list, but I have just looked through the Oxford candidates, and Hugh Lee (the furthest into the alphabet to be returned) was the 14th down the alphabetical list of 19 candidates. For some strange reason there were 6 candidates whose surnames begin with a B!!

Posted by Hannah at Friday, 15 October 2010 at 11:33am BST

It would seem that conservative catholic and conservative evangelicals have lost out in the House of Clergy but it looks as if both constituencies have held up in the House of Laity.I wonder how far that reflects the current composition of Diocesan Synods? I suspect neither groupings are as strong at Diocesan level.

Posted by Perry Butler at Friday, 15 October 2010 at 1:07pm BST

Gosh ! Bibles in churches eh ? Radical stuff this.

Whatever next.

Posted by Laurence Roberts at Friday, 15 October 2010 at 4:03pm BST

With a small number of clergy seats still to declare there are already 55 women in the House of Clergy, as opposed to 38 in the last synod at the point it ended.

Looking at the voting records for, e.g. the Archbishops' amendments, it is clear that almost all the women in the House of Clergy voted against, and the amendments were lost in that house. This may, then be very significant for the next quinquennium.

Posted by Wilf at Friday, 15 October 2010 at 4:20pm BST

John Hartley is a loss. I can't remember voting with him often, and his mastery of points of order could get wearing, but he combined an intelligent analysis of what was before us with a genuine concern for the gospel and a commitment to the parish system of the Church of England. In Synod he stressed the importance of individual contributions and the need for careful and critical review of what would, after all, become statute law. He also had a splendid sense of humour: Syond needs a laugh every so often.

Posted by Philip French at Friday, 15 October 2010 at 9:44pm BST

It seems to me that the General Synod is top heavy with Archdeacons - on a rough count I make it 30 - as opposed to a mere 3 Deans. The Venerables by far outnumber the Very Reverends three to one - for whom I believe there are seperate voting arrangements - i.e. Deans vote for a select number of Deans to represent them on the General Synod. In the interests of fairness and balance would it not be better if Archdeacons similarly voted for a restricted and much reduced number of Archdeacons to represent them on the General Synod? The vast majority of cathedral deans are in priests orders (exceptionally the Dean of St. Paul's is in episcopal orders)- yet curiously they are voted for seperately. I know of no current Archdeacon similarly in episcopal orders. Although in former times the role of suffragan bishop was often combined with Archidiaconal duties - now there's a cost cutting exercise if ever I saw one. However - with 9 of the 30 elected Archdeacons being female - that would presently not be possible - especially if, as has been stated, Traditionalists have made synodical gains in the House of Laity and the final vote on Women in the episcopacy falls at the last hurdle. But in this period of limbo - I for one am all for having a cull on Archdeacons on the Synod.

Posted by Father David at Tuesday, 19 October 2010 at 5:54am BST

As you were - make that "the Venerables by far outnumber the Very Reverends ten to one". Maths never was my strong point!

Posted by Father David at Tuesday, 19 October 2010 at 8:55pm BST

Yes, Sue Slater, Simon Cox is Tim Cox's father

Posted by Grant at Saturday, 30 October 2010 at 12:39am BST
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