Comments: Retiring Bishops

Isn't it incredible that the appointment of a suffragan bishop to the ex cotton fields of Lancashire has attracted 77 comments but the retirement of +Tim Leicester has not garnered a single comment? Not even a "well done,thou good and faithful servant"!

Posted by Father David at Thursday, 20 November 2014 at 5:33am GMT

Interesting to see if Repton is replaced. A 'recent' diocese, not terribly big, and not run in an area bishop manner. A candidate for a Yorkshire style rearrangement?

Posted by Fr William at Friday, 21 November 2014 at 1:48pm GMT

Just heard (? reliable): he will not. Announed at diocesan synod apparently. A prime candidate for divvying up to neighbouring dioceses.

Posted by Fr William at Friday, 21 November 2014 at 5:10pm GMT

Leicester may be considered as part of a reconfiguration of the Peterborough area. The Dioceses Commission looked at the Peterborough/Ely boundary first but only very minor changes resulted. I suspect a wider reorganization is pending when the Commission gets round to it. Leicester was created out of Peterborough in 1927. Will it make its centenary, I wonder?

Posted by Simon Kershaw at Friday, 21 November 2014 at 7:41pm GMT

Simon, if you are suggesting that Leicester may well be demoted and lumped in with a neighbouring older diocese in the C of E's continuing rationalisation scheme, may it not have been a mistaken decision to have the remains of a former monarch (Richard III) repose in Leicester, albeit in more salubrious surroundings than his previous resting place under a car park? Would not York Minster have been a more suitable and significant a cathedral for the tomb of a monarch than Leicester?

Posted by Father David at Saturday, 22 November 2014 at 3:35am GMT

Perhaps Fr David, a more appropriate resting place for Richard 111, who being a staunch Catholic would if not at York, be the nearest RC Cathedral to Leicester, which I've been told is Nottingham. If I'm wrong I can only apologise as my geography of down south is a bit sketchy

Posted by Henry Dee at Thursday, 27 November 2014 at 1:31pm GMT

The Church of England is the successor in this land of that undivided western Church (and to suggest anything else is contrary to Canon Law, Canon A1). Richard III was a member of the English Church at a time when it was in communion with the See of Rome.

Posted by Simon Kershaw at Thursday, 27 November 2014 at 7:43pm GMT
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