Comments: Morning news

A GS colleague of mine has pointed out that Gene's consecration was legal, unlike the first ordinations of women. So why should the US participants in the deed be forced to apologise?

Posted by Penny at Tuesday, 19 October 2004 at 11:25am BST

The Windsor Report suggests that all future Bishops in the Communion must be such that their ministry will be "received and recognized" by all Anglican Provinces.

This must mean no more women bishops, then, as women bishop cannot legally confirm or ordain in the Church of England. And no more homophobic bishops, or bishops whose views on the role of women in society would be unacceptable to ECUSA.

If I'm wrong (as I obviously am), why doesn't the report explain why it's only the bishop's sexuality that matters?

Posted by Russell at Tuesday, 19 October 2004 at 1:13pm BST

Is the Windsor Report somewhat Fulcrumesque?

The Fulcrum initial statement on it, and the submission, are up on the Fulcrum site


www.fulcrum-anglican.org.uk

Posted by Graham Kings at Tuesday, 19 October 2004 at 1:33pm BST

The 'literal'/'non-literal' debate resurrected by Spong is an old chestnut.

Plenty of parts of the Bible (notably, laws, narrative parts and letters) are obviously intended to be taken literally. The alternative is MontyPythonesque. Matthew, Mark, Luke and John saying 'Well of course we didnt mean that Jesus literally died.' Paul saying 'Well, of course I don't mean that you are literally justified by faith'.

Dr Spong must know this really. We all know it. We have all told the story of events in our lives, and (while interpretation and shaping are inevitable) we take it for granted that these will be taken literally. We have all written letters, and we also take it for granted that these will be taken literally.

Of course, there are some parts of the Bible (imagery in the Song of Songs) that do not intend us to take them literally. But these are not the parts germane to the present debate, for which the main relevant biblical genres are laws, gospels and letters.

Posted by Dr Christopher Shell at Saturday, 23 October 2004 at 2:04pm BST