Thinking Anglicans

Archbishop of Canterbury’s New Advisor for Reconciliation

Press release from the Archbishop of Canterbury:

Archbishop of Canterbury’s New Advisor for Reconciliation
Wednesday 27th July 2016

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, has announced the appointment of Sarah Snyder as his new Advisor for Reconciliation.

She takes over from Canon David Porter who moved into his new role as Chief of Staff and Strategy to the Archbishop at the beginning of May.

Sarah will take up the role in September. She will be part of the senior team at Lambeth Palace while also being based at Coventry Cathedral, where Archbishop Justin’s Reconciliation Ministry has been established since its inception. Her role will have a particular emphasis on supporting the Church in contexts of violent conflict or post-conflict and helping the Church to be an agent of reconciliation and conflict-transformation.

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A theologian who specialises in Jewish-Christian-Muslim relations, Sarah brings wide-ranging international experience of peace-building and dialogue. She has worked for many years to promote faith-based reconciliation, most recently as Director of Partnerships with Religions for Peace International, an organisation affiliated to the United Nations. Sarah has also directed the Cambridge International Summer Schools for faith leaders from conflict zones. A trained mediator, she has experience both of working with communities and with senior religious leaders.

Sarah is Founding Director of the Rose Castle Foundation, an international centre of reconciliation, based in the north of England, offering safe space in which to address misunderstanding of the “other”, particularly those of different religious traditions. Located in the beautiful Cumbrian countryside, it is a peaceful haven in which to transform conflict within and between faith communities, and to train up a generation of leaders equipped as faith-based mediators. It is chaired by the Bishop of Carlisle, James Newcome, and Professor David Ford, and welcomes people of all faith traditions and none.

Sarah also collaborates with St Ethelburga’s Centre for Reconciliation and Peace in the City of London, supporting individuals and communities to work together despite their differences and divisions. St Ethelburga’s is situated in a church destroyed by a bomb in 1993, and is itself a powerful symbol of hope in the midst of conflict.

Speaking about the appointment, Archbishop Justin said:

“I am delighted that Sarah Snyder will be my Advisor for Reconciliation. Sarah brings a wealth of experience and many gifts to the role which will enrich both her reconciliation work and the senior team at Lambeth Palace. I am also grateful for the continued partnership with Coventry Cathedral where my reconciliation ministry will continue to be based. Events in recent weeks remind us that that reconciliation is more of a priority than ever – this is the hope we offer in the good news of Jesus.”

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Laurence Cunnington
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Laurence Cunnington

“…offering safe space in which to address misunderstanding of the “other”…”

I’ve just tripped over the broken remains of my irony meter.

Kate
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Kate

I was struck by the lack of humility in the reference to “MY reconciliation ministry” (emphasis added).

Is there really no way we can follow the Conservatives, Labour and UKIP and have a leadership election?

FrDavidH
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FrDavidH

Poor woman. She’ll soon realise she’s failed when she talks to members of Anglican ‘Mainstream’.

David Runcorn
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Kate For what it is worth I don’t read it that way at all. She has a ministry of reconciliation. Can’t she say so? And I simply don’t understand your second comment about holding elections like political parties. Do you mean we should hold church-wide elections for anyone appointed onto the Lambeth staff?

Disgraceful
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Disgraceful

David R I think you misunderstand. “My reconciliation ministry” are the words of the ABC not the new advisor. And the rather cheeky but funny reference to holding elections was surely a reference to Augustine’s successor not the Lambeth staff.

David Runcorn
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Ah – apologies. The mist is clearing.

robert ian williams
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robert ian williams

Reconciliation in Christ and his liberating Gospel or political correctness?

Sadly the word reconciliation is now as hi-jacked as evangelical.

James Byron
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James Byron

This is putting the cart before the horses: you reconcile *after* discrimination has ended, not before; and the victims of discrimination have every right to choose not to.

Gotta be the first time that an institutionally homophobic organization refers to “safe spaces,” just as Welby is punctilious about using “LGBTI.” Say all the right things, while continuing to do all the wrong ones. Talk about schizophrenic!

David Keen
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David Keen
Kate
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Kate

David, I sincerely hope not because it seems to be contrary to the teaching of 1 Corinthians 10.

Andrew
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Andrew

Reconciliation means reconciling oneself with Welby’s strategy for the Communion. Good disagreement? Agree with me or else face the consequences. If it means there are to be no safe spaces for LGBT ministers, even in supposedly liberal dioceses, then so be it: that’s absolutely central to the strategy for unity with GAFCON. Another Primates Meeting is pencilled in for October next year apparently. Forget ‘shared conversations’, he has no hope of getting them all to attend unless CofE bishops are absolutely uncompromising in relation to the HoB’s Pastoral Statement on same-sex marriage.

Susannah Clark
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The world needs more interfaith sharing, not less. When we hold different beliefs, we still share common humanity, and the command to love crosses faith boundaries. Yes, we should be grateful for the opportunities to eat together and journey together, as – in common with one another – we face the challenges of building community, helping our neighbours, caring for our elderly, encouraging our young. Reconciliation of this kind, between faiths, and between communities in places of strife, is desperately needed. I enjoy worshipping and studying at East London Mosque when I am in London. I am transsexual, I am… Read more »

Kate
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Kate

Susannah
There is a vast chasm of difference between inter-faith dialogue and co-operation which should be encouraged, and the archbishop hosting – or even attending – an iftar to break a Ramadan fast.

There is a very sharp line between being respectful of the observances and customs of another religion and participating in, or giving the impression of, participation in, the observances and customs of another religion. That line absolutely should not be crossed by anyone in ordained orders.

Susannah Clark
Guest

Kate, Fasting is a custom of the Christian religion too. As is hospitality. I see absolutely nothing wrong with fasting and sharing food, in solidarity with one another, and it highlights things we have in common. Considering the mayhem caused around the world by religious extremists, I’d have thought that idealistic young people and faith leaders joining together – expressing the moderate values of their faiths or beliefs – eating together, being friends together… is far more constructive than the kind of bunker mentality that extremists adopt. Christian leaders setting an example seems to me like a positive thing. What… Read more »

Susannah Clark
Guest

Oops – Justin, not Julian! *typo*

JCF
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JCF

“Reconciliation in Christ and his liberating Gospel or political correctness?”

What I (gratefully) call the former, RIW, you would probably dismiss as the latter. Conversely, anyone who speaks of the latter, usually seems to be badly in need of experiencing (for a change) the former.

Kyrie eleison. Lord, grant us all more Light!

Pat O'Neill
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Pat O'Neill

Kate: Surely you are not suggesting that the mere sharing of a meal with those of another faith (even a meal with some religious connotations) is tantamount to eating the flesh of a sacrifice? In your eyes, did I commit a sin when I accepted my friend’s invitation to his Seder?