Thinking Anglicans

Retirement of the Bishop of Monmouth

The Church in Wales announced yesterday that the Bishop of Monmouth, the Rt Revd Richard Pain, was to retire at the end of the month, ie yesterday. Bishop Richard has served the Diocese of Monmouth for 34 years, the last six as Bishop. He is retiring “due to ill health following an absence of several months from his duties”.

The South Wales Argus published this report of the bishop’s retirement: The Bishop of Monmouth, Richard Pain, has retired following nine-month absence. It includes links to earlier stories about his prolonged absence from duties.

The Church Times published this back in January: An end to Bishop of Monmouth’s long absence may be in sight.

4
Leave a Reply

avatar
3000
3 Comment threads
1 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
4 Comment authors
Stephen GriffithsMarion OwenAlwyn JamesChristopher Rees Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest
Notify of
Christopher Rees
Guest
Christopher Rees

Keeping Bishop Richard and the Monmouth Diocese in my prayers.

Alwyn James
Guest
Alwyn James

This is not a good time to be an Anglican in Wales. The sense of insecurity flowing from decline is even more pronounced than in the Church of England, and the senior leadership is flaying around hopelessly and grasping at flimsy straws. What is happening to Bishop Richard, as I see it, is symptomatic of a paucity of wisdom, learning and experience at the top of the ecclesial food chain. This situation should not have been allowed to drag on as it has; and it will take decades to heal the hurt and division that has taken root in the… Read more »

Marion Owen
Guest
Marion Owen

As an ordinary foot soldier of the Church in Wales, living in a parish in the Diocese of Monmouth, this episode has been deeply hurtful. We have known and loved Bishop Richard for many years, as he has been vicar of a major parish in the diocese, then an archdeacon, and then been our caring bishop for too short a time. He is much in our prayers at this difficult time. I agree with Alwyn James that our Church has been adrift for too long. There is a painfully obvious lack of solid, grounded and rounded, leadership. With one possible… Read more »

Stephen Griffiths
Guest
Stephen Griffiths

I very much appreciate and admire the honesty of the comments above. It’s very rare that we name and own the reality of the life of the church. Through a fascinating recent conversation with a priest I learned a lot about the nature of Anglicanism in Wales. Those who feel poorly led and marginalised are, I learned, beginning to organise themselves well. But how sad that senior leaders cannot generate a sense of purpose and unity. A few key people could make a hugely positive difference across the province. Let’s pray that they feel the call to lead, and receive… Read more »