Thinking Anglicans

opinions for discussion

Paul Vallely asks in the Independent Religion vs science: can the divide between God and rationality be reconciled?

Ann Pettifor writes in the Guardian about usury, see Face to Faith.

Graham Kings writes in The Times about Living in time with the rhythm of the Church’s year.

Giles Fraser writes in the Church Times about the Episcopal Church, It does not look like a snake-pit in the pews.

Jonathan Wynne-Jones writes at the Telegraph that Happy-clappy songs are judged to have ruined Britain.

Christopher Howse writes about A tax on the font water of our struggling churches.

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Pat O'NeillRudigerVTCheryl Va.Ford ElmsCynthia Gilliatt Recent comment authors
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kieran crichton
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kieran crichton

Simon — there’s an h missing from the http in the link to the Howse article

Thanks, proves I shouldn’t blog before coffee…
S.

Charlotte
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Charlotte

Thank you, Giles Fraser, and not for the first time.

Cheryl Va.
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There is something very sad about about literal Creationists (or other faith leaders) trying to puport that they have the “truth” and all other knowledge is hyperbole or evil or untrue. For a start, it simply forgets that most of the most brilliant breakthroughs across all the disciplines come from souls who have a well-grounded faith in God. It is often those with the greatest faith who are able to make the greatest breakthroughs. Their faith in God and God’s authority to hold the universe together that enables them to let go of existing paradigms and see the world anew.… Read more »

Cynthia Gilliatt
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Cynthia Gilliatt

The ABC had ample opportunity to worship in a wide variety of Episcopal churches while he was holed up with the Jesuits, writing his book. He could have gone to St. Stephen and the Incarnation, with its diverse congregation and wildly liberal liturgy, or St. Paul’s, K Street, which is so nosebleed high chruch that the Pope would get dizzy, or he could have gone to one of the predominantly Black churches, whose high church litrugy is spiced by a Gospel choir, or he could have gone to National Cathedral,or he could have ventured into the ‘burbs to see ordinary,… Read more »

Ford Elms
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Ford Elms

“There must be many who would agree that the attempts to make worship more modern and contemporary have left it banal and vacuous.”

And that’s being kind! If he seriously thinks:

“the dreaded ASB, unrhythmic, babyish”

then he should come to Canada. The Book of Abysmal Services makes the ASB shine. I happen to like the ASB, actually, but maybe that’s after thirty years of the Canadian BAS. Well conceived, but so poorly executed as to be a disgrace. That the prefaces actually seeks to excuse the linguistic and poetic ineptitude of the compilers is even more disgusting.

RudigerVT
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RudigerVT

“most of the most brilliant breakthroughs across all the disciplines come from souls who have a well-grounded faith in God”

Oh?
Citation, please.

LPR

Cheryl Va.
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http://www.godandscience.org/apologetics/sciencefaith.html This list includes: Nicholas Copernicus (1473-1543) Sir Francis Bacon (1561-1627) Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) Rene Descartes (1596-1650) Isaac Newton (1642-1727) Robert Boyle (1791-1867) Michael Faraday (1791-1867) Gregor Mendel (1822-1884) William Thomson Kelvin (1824-1907) http://www.rateitall.com/t-2270-famous-people-who-believe-in-god.aspx, which has 54 pages of famous people who believe in God http://www.talkjesus.com/lounge/22490-bible-quotes-famous-people.html which includes these examples: “It is impossible to rightly govern the world without God and the Bible.” George Washington “If we will not be governed by God, then we will be ruled by tyrants.” William Penn “A single line in the Bible has consoled me more than all the books I… Read more »

RudigerVT
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RudigerVT

Er, “anecdote” is not the plural of data. That list couldn’t begin to fill a small department at a small research university. I think it’s nice that some productive and famous scientists have also been members of faith communities. But I think it is unnecessary to posit a correlation (ie, that being a person of faith tends to co-exist with scientific productivity) and certainly unfounded to suppose that their is anything causal, in either or both directions. Science looks for things unseen: the laws that appear to govern events in the real world. Faith, too, is about what is unseen.… Read more »

Pat O'Neill
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Pat O'Neill

“Science looks for things unseen: the laws that appear to govern events in the real world. Faith, too, is about what is unseen. But science can be wrong.”

So can faith, when it is misplaced.