Thinking Anglicans

opinion

Miranda Threlfall-Holmes 5 Things I miss about being Laity

Cathy Newman interviews Rose Hudson-Wilkin for The Telegraph Rev Rose Hudson-Wilkin: The truth? We’re all fearful for the first female bishops

Rupert Christiansen The Telegraph Why do Christmas carols make the church feel nervous?

Erasmus The Economist Hello ladies, goodbye Communion?

Lucy Ward The Guardian Una Kroll: ‘Public protest is still very important’

Sam Wells The Christian Century Dressed for the moment

Bosco Peters A Bishop is not a Priest

Isabel Berwick Financial Times From atheist teenager to lady of the parish

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Sister Mary
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Sister Mary

I hope that at least three women will be consecrated within a very short time of each other. That should ease the burden of being the first.

I suspect that the episcopal appointment of a woman will be a challenge to most Suffragans apart from those of very well-balanced temperament and experience. It will involve a shattering of subconscious and entrenched stereotypes for many. But it will be a great work of grace.

Cynthia
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Cynthia

That’s a very wise suggestion, Sister Mary.

In a lot of places, WO and WB came as a breath of fresh air. In CoE, it was held up so long that the fresh air might come as gale force winds… Better to start with a threesome or so.

Nathaniel Brown
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Nathaniel Brown

The Anglican Communion was an accident of imperial expansion in the first place, and has never had such a thing as a unifying head or curia. If the communion falls, there is a distinct possibility that national churches will be better able to serve the people of their respective countries. The end of the communion could well mean the growth of the churches at home.

peter kettle
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Episcopal ordinations in Province of Canterbury often have more than one candidate, and in a place like St Paul’s there is room for a large congregation. Don’t know about York Minster, but it would also lessen the burden of spotlight if there were episcopal ordinations in both Provinces on the same day.

Pam
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Pam

Now I know why Superman wears a cape!

Sam Wells’ “Dressed for the Moment”, especially paragraphs 6 & 7, reveals the importance of presentation and perception in winning confidence.

Geoff
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I agree broadly with Nathaniel: what we are seeing is not the death of the communion but the death of a particular late 19th/early 20th century tractarian and pan-anglican myth of the communion as a holistic and unified Branch of the Church.

Rod Gillis
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Rod Gillis

Appreciate the point of view of Sam Wells re the clerical collar, but in the main I disagree. I stopped wearing a clerical collar for almost all functions, including with vestments at liturgies, about fifteen years ago. Being in the same parish for over a decade helped, since most folks knew the rector. I also encouraged people to call me by the name I was given at Baptism, rather than “Father” or “Canon” or “reverend”. The first time I did hospital visiting without a collar I set out with a little apprehension. I often encountered non-attending folks from my parish… Read more »

Laurence Cunnington
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Laurence Cunnington

“Better to start with a threesome” Cynthia

The perils of US English v British English!

Laurie
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Laurie

Yes ordain several women to the episcopate at one big service in Southwark Cathedral or somewhere just a wonderful

have overflow facilities too all over the country perhaps.

Suffragans and diocesans and

one or two women flying bishops of course !

maranatha !

Cynthia
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Cynthia

“”Better to start with a threesome” Cynthia

The perils of US English v British English!”

It works either way for me! 😉

JCF
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JCF

@ Cynthia & Lawrence: {Austin Powers’ voice} “Oh, BEHAVE!” ;-p

Laurie
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Laurie

What fun these linguistic eddyings doth bring us !

Jeremy
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Jeremy

‘[W]hat we are seeing is not the death of the communion but the death of a particular late 19th/early 20th century tractarian and pan-anglican myth of the communion as a holistic and unified Branch of the Church.’

True in part. But the myth has persisted into this century because some (Lambeth staff, GAFCON prelates) find the myth useful.

Nathaniel Brown’s point about the Communion being an accident of imperial expansion is extremely well taken. For that very reason, the Communion will always be regarded with skepticism.

Tim Chesterton
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Rod Gillis, I heartily agree!