Friday, 1 September 2006

other American Anglicans

The number of congregations in the United States of America that regard themselves as “Anglican” but “outside of ECUSA” is already quite large. Some of these go back to the nineteenth century. There is an interesting map here, which shows a total of 457, although it also says that it is incomplete. These numbers include a few Canadian parishes (see comments).

This total breaks down as follows:

Groups which are directly linked to some other province of the Anglican Communion:
AMiA-113, Southern Cone-26, Uganda-23, Nigeria-15, Kenya-14, Brazil-Recife-6
The AMiA is, according to its own website “a missionary outreach of the Province of the Episcopal Church of Rwanda”.

Other Groups:
APA-71, REC-38, ACA-36, EMC-27, UEC-25, Unknown-18, CEC-17, UAC-12, , ACiC-6, APCK-4, OAC-2, DHC-2, ACCC-1, APCGS-1
More information about these groups can be found in the Anglicans Online list of ‘Not in the Communion’.
AMiA, APA, and REC are Common Cause Partners as is CANA.

Posted by Simon Sarmiento on Friday, 1 September 2006 at 9:41am BST | TrackBack
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Categorised as: ECUSA
Comments

Surely any such a total should also include

the 10 diocese in the ACN
the other couple of diocese that are applying for APO
the 250+ parishes that are individual members of the ACN.

So overall there are about 1,000 parishes that are outside ECUSA yet meaningfully Anglican.

Current estimates say that approximately 10% of diocese, 20% of members, and 30% of tithing (not investment) income is now going to the Network rather than ECUSA.

Posted by: Sinner on Friday, 1 September 2006 at 12:35pm BST

“The number of congregations in the United States of America that regard themselves as ‘Anglican’ but “outside of ECUSA” is already quite large. Some of these go back to the nineteenth century. There is an interesting map here, which shows a total of 457, although it also says that it is incomplete."

“Quite large,” Simon? I would say the total is “quite small” given the fact that the Episcopal Church has 7, 347 parishes. They may seem larger than they are because of lung power, not people power.

Posted by: Kurt on Friday, 1 September 2006 at 1:59pm BST

The rate of new parishes being reported is at about 5 now, after being in the dozens per day when I first posted the map, so most of the provinces are getting pretty complete. APCGS and APCK is pretty incomplete compared to their size.

Also, I consider ACiC as in-communion to the same degree that AMiA is since there are very similar.

Based on the incoming rate, I expect the map to top out at about 500 once all are entered. It will continue to increase as more ECUSA parishes leave and more new plants are started by the various groups listed.

Posted by: GDAF on Friday, 1 September 2006 at 4:35pm BST

GDAF
Thanks for the additional information.
At 5/day it should "top out" at 500 within the next two weeks.
By ACiC do you mean Anglican Coalition in Canada? If so, then these should not be counted as part of the USA total, but as part of a separate Canadian number.

Posted by: Simon Sarmiento on Friday, 1 September 2006 at 6:20pm BST

Kurt
My point was that the number of recent additions (Uganda, Nigeria, Recife, Southern Cone) is small compared to the less new AMiA total and the combined total of the older groups.

Posted by: Simon Sarmiento on Friday, 1 September 2006 at 6:25pm BST

>From Sinner on including ACN parishes
I'm not making value judgements here, just showing non-ECUSA parishes. The map DOES include ACN affiliated parishes that are under foreign oversight, but does not include ACN parishes and dioceses that are still under ECUSA. I think your count of the later is right at about 1,000.

>From Kurt on being "quite small".
It is what it is. The important points are:
1) There are more joining these ranks almost daily through AMiA plants, ecusa parishes leaving, ... If you add this 500 to the 1,000 parishes that are currently still under ecusa but looking for a way out, then you get to 1500 vs 6300 remaining in ecusa. Most important, the 1500 number is increasing weekly while the 6300 is falling fast.
2) The various dialects of non-ecusa Anglicanism are converging. Witness Common Cause, Anglican Federation, etc. Alphabet soup right now, but the signs are clearly that they are coming together rather than splintering.

>From Simon on counting ACiC
The map includes Canadian provinces (~10) as well as Puerto Rico (~4). The statistics at the bottom of the map shows a state by state and province by province total.

I'm in the process of adding a filter by region of the country because the map is getting really slow as the list of parishes has grown. Yahoo Maps probably hates me for beating their servers so hard.

Posted by: GDAF on Friday, 1 September 2006 at 7:48pm BST

Please note that the Anglican Province of America and the Reformed Episcopal Church are officially linked to a province of the Anglican Communion as of 12 November 2005, when a formal Covenant Union was established bewteen the Church of Nigeria (Anglican Communion) and the APA and REC. God bless you!

http://www.anglicanprovince.org/nigeria.html

Posted by: Father Chandler Holder Jones, SSC on Friday, 1 September 2006 at 9:47pm BST

“There are more joining these ranks almost daily through AMiA plants, ecusa parishes leaving, ... If you add this 500 to the 1,000 parishes that are currently still under ecusa but looking for a way out, then you get to 1500 vs 6300 remaining in ecusa. Most important, the 1500 number is increasing weekly while the 6300 is falling fast.”—GDAF

Perhaps, but I have followed the developments of non-Episcopal “Anglicans” for more than 30 years and it looks to me like a lot of wishful thinking on your part. One has to remember that in the so-called “orthodox” dioceses there are many parishes that reject affiliation with them and adhere to the Episcopal Church majority. (Up to one third of Pittsburgh parishes, for example, have no intention whatsoever of splitting from TEC even though they are located in a “hotbed” of “orthodoxy”). I think that when push comes to shove, you will be unpleasantly surprised at the number of parishes in these dioceses which will stay. But even if the number leaving were as high as 10 per cent, it would be worth it, to me anyway, to lose 700 parishes to finally be rid of them once and for all.

Posted by: Kurt on Friday, 1 September 2006 at 9:54pm BST

Oh geez, Simon, you might as well list Methodist and Baptist congregations. They are no more (and, in some cases, less) *ex*-Anglican, than are the schismatics listed above!

The *True Charisms* of Anglicanism --- Cranmer, Hooker, Elizabeth I, the evangelicalism of Wilberforce, the Anglo-Catholicism of Pusey and (early) Newman, the multicultural sanctity of Absalom Jones, David Pendleton Oakerhater (feast day today!) and Jonathan M. Daniels --- are (in the USA at least!) "pleased to dwell" IN THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Period!

Nothing that the schismatics (whether sowing further dissension, or planting churches of their critically-deficient "gospel") --- nor the Big Wigs/mitres across the water --- can do, can change that (*if* TEC stays true to the Gospel of Christ: overall, despite B033, the signs are still positive). Come, Lord Jesus! :-D

Posted by: J. C. Fisher on Friday, 1 September 2006 at 10:45pm BST

Oh, and GDAF: re "the signs are clearly that they are coming together rather than splintering"?

Just one thing: "And Herod and Pilate became friends with each other that very day..." :-(

Posted by: J. C. Fisher on Friday, 1 September 2006 at 10:49pm BST

>looks to me like a lot of wishful thinking on your part

I'm mainly only interested in one parish (mine) and don't really care about the competition between the various flavors. It could be million to one for all I care.

>you might as well list Methodist and Baptist congregations.

Very good point. Just the Southern Baptists have 41,000+ congregations and United Methodist have 36,000+ vs. maybe 8000 of all flavors of Anglicanism. This is without counting other flavors of Baptists and Methodists, which are likely larger than all of those that call themselves Anglicans. Yet TEC takes it upon itself to try to redefine the Gospel when virtually all of the rest of Christendom says they are wrong.

>critically-deficient "gospel"

Our gospel is the same as has been practiced through the ages. If you consider it deficient, then you have to consider Cranmer and many others deficient as well because they clearly would not recognize the mess that TEC and many other churches put forward today.

>it would be worth it, to me anyway, to lose 700 parishes

I wish everyone on your side of the issue felt this way and we could be done with the whole mess.

Posted by: GDAF on Saturday, 2 September 2006 at 1:54am BST

"But even if the number leaving were as high as 10 per cent, it would be worth it, to me anyway, to lose 700 parishes to finally be rid of them once and for all."

I'm not feeling the inclusive love in the comment above, nor any tolerance, nor any appreciation of diversity.

"The *True Charisms* of Anglicanism --- Cranmer, Hooker, Elizabeth I, the evangelicalism of Wilberforce, the Anglo-Catholicism of Pusey and (early) Newman, the multicultural sanctity of Absalom Jones, David Pendleton Oakerhater (feast day today!) and Jonathan M. Daniels --- are (in the USA at least!) "pleased to dwell" IN THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Period!"

When ecusa returns to the doctrine of Cranmer, Hooker and Wilberforce (which I don't expect to happen, at least any time soon), then ecusa can claim the true charisms of Anglicanism. Until such time, the Spirit has left ecusa and gone to dwell with the true Anglican Church, the ACN being the true American expression.

Posted by: Tony on Saturday, 2 September 2006 at 12:52pm BST

According to the article the map shows 38 REC congregations, whereas the REC website lists 137. I would suspect that there are other discrepancies like this from this source.

Posted by: Tony on Saturday, 2 September 2006 at 2:54pm BST

'the whole mess' is on, what I'll call the historical level. But there is,another dimension, I believe, unspoilt by the whole mess. I think we could use various words for this level. I want to call it the ultimate dimension. There are no 700 'there'. Or to put another way, 'there' we ourselves 'are' the 700....

How shall we, today, on the historical level open to the ultimate dimension ?

I believe I have experienced or known something of it in

'the silence of eternity
interpretted by love'

I think the Beatitudes and sermon on the mount can evoke this dimension --probably different for each of us, what gets us there...

'Defiled or immaculate
increasing or decreasing
these qualities exist only in our minds
the reality of inter-being
is unsurpassed...'

May all beings be well
May all beings be happy

Posted by: laurence roberts on Saturday, 2 September 2006 at 3:08pm BST

"Our gospel is the same as has been practiced through the ages."

Obviously, that's your opinion, GDAF.

Though I consider it incorrect, even *with* your version of the gospel, you'd still be welcome --- included, even --- within the eucharistic fellowship of the Episcopal Church.

Doesn't work the other way around though, does it? (Even though --- Lord help me! --- I hope and pray I'm being faithful to the Gospel of Christ "through the ages": the fact that I consider that Gospel to be inclusive of LGBT persons, and their committed relationships, makes me beyond the pale of your ACN.)

I surrender all, to the merciful judgment of my Lord Jesus...

Posted by: J. C. Fisher on Saturday, 2 September 2006 at 6:06pm BST

Lovely posting Laurence (re Beatitudes). Thanks for this GDAF and Simon. Actually quantifying the beast makes it seem less scary (a bit like a child being too scared to look under the bed, but when they finally do the monster was their teddy bear). There are some souls who will not be tolerant to GLBTs and will feel a need to keep themselves pure. That's fine. I just pray that God gives them enough sense to not gate-crash or attack those who would be tolerant and inclusive. The AIDS pandemic has made it a necessity to accept that there is a broad spectrum in human sexuality, and that it is in everyone's best interest to get as many people as possible in monogamous faithful relationships. That will mean we need churches that encourage and support souls in such endeavours, and those churches will evolve and will draw congregations as there is a need which can not be denied. The only thing that is at issue is who will help in this work, and who would put roadblocks in the way. Those who would help will clear the path for others e.g. http://www.hrc.org/scripture/ which is an online gay scripture resource that I found advertised earlier this week @ http://www.247gay.com/article.cfm?section=66&id=10389

Posted by: Cheryl Clough on Saturday, 2 September 2006 at 7:19pm BST

>>>I'm not feeling the inclusive love in the comment above, nor any tolerance, nor any appreciation of diversity.

No community is obligated to include, love, tolerate, or celebrate that which is openly dedicated to its destruction. I know that it's become a popular reactionary strategy to appropriate and subvert progressive lingo in this way, but it really doesn't convince anyone.

As for whether all these "Continuing Anglican" groups are going to come together, that's doubtful. These splinter groups have been around for ages, and still they remain splintered. Shared resentment is not much of a foundation for a church, or anything else.

Given the example of these earlier breakaway groups and the tendency of purity movements always to look for new enemies, I think it is a safe bet that if the Neopuritans finally do get up the nerve to shove off, they will soon enough fall out among themselves.

The Anglo-Baptists will soon enough get it in for the Anglo-Catholics, the non-woman-ordainers will try to expel the heretical woman-ordainers, the sanctity-of-marriage crowd will get fed up with the serial monogamists, the happy-clappies will get tired of being expected to use a prayerbook, which will infuriate the 1928 prayerbook fetishists, etc.

If history is any guide, the Neopuritan movement will soon enough consist of many small, scattered sects, each claiming to be the "real" Anglicans.

Posted by: New Here on Saturday, 2 September 2006 at 11:35pm BST

GDAF, I do appreciate the map. I do think there are a few small groups not listed on the map that do appear on the Anglicans Online "Not in Communion" page. There are also a couple of groups who use the title Anglican that are more liberal than the Episcopal Church, rather than more conservative. The Evangelical Anglican Church *in* America is a case in point (to be distinguished from the Evangelical Anglican Church *of* America, which is more conservative).

But your initial comment does beg a question that is not settled. You speak of congregations that are "meaningfully Anglican." That, of course, is still a matter of dispute. If "meaningfully Anglican" means recognition by Canterbury, none of them are. If it means "having episcopal orders from the Anglican tradition," that's one group. If it means "following one strain of the broad Anglican tradition," that's another group. "Using some form of the historic Book of Common Prayer" would include a few more. If it means "using the title Anglican and believing the Episcopal Church is wrong," that includes almost all, including those that think the Episcopal Church isn't inclusive enough.

Most of the groups value the historic episcopate; but few have their orders through Anglican roots. (I'm not questioning the orders some have received from, for example, an autocephalous Orthodox prelate; I am only commenting that they are not Anglican.) Some few have their orders through a church in the "independent catholic" category, with histories that are, shall we say, difficult to document clearly.

Certainly, we can agree that "meaningfully Anglican" must mean more than "using the title Anglican and believing that the Episcopal Church is wrong." It is unclear even yet what other than that, though, is definitive of these "Anglican" congregations.

Posted by: Marshall Scott on Sunday, 3 September 2006 at 4:04am BST

Equally, if history is any guide, the Episcopal Church--with its precipitously declining membership--will soon enough be joining the rest of the pack as a small, scattered sect, while still claiming to be the "real" Anglicans.

Overall, from all sides of the controversy, a sad end to a great and historic denomination within the U.S.--

Posted by: Steven on Monday, 4 September 2006 at 8:43pm BST

Marshall wrote:
>>You speak of congregations that are
>>"meaningfully Anglican." That, of course, is
>>still a matter of dispute.

I don't disagree with anything that you said. In a nutshell, my criteria for deciding if someone is Anglican is if they say they are and a cursory reading of their provincial website indicates a level of Anglican tradition in their beliefs and practices. I put them on the map and let the reader decide for themselves with no editorializing on my part. That is why I have even limited the subjective material by each parish on the map (i.e. only thing allowed in the description is objective directions to their services, etc.) I'm trying to keep the subjective material on their parish's own website and that of it's province, but I conceed that even placing them on the map entails some degree of subjectivity.

So far I would say that all provinces on the map do consider ECUSA wrong, but they vary greatly in regards to both what they consider wrong (WO, sexuality issues, scripture issues, etc.) as well as the timing of the when ECUSA reached the last straw (..., 1979, 2001, 2003, ...)

As for the completeness of the map, it is a continuing work in progress. REC is woefully lacking in that it is about the same size as AMiA as I understand it. I've reached out to the REC community to try to fill in the details. I have scraped a few of the province's websites for their parish directories, but most have woefully out of date info. For the provinces that are close to complete (AMiA, APA, for sure) the data in the map database is definitely more complete and accurate than their own websites. About 75% of the entries (over 300) came from the internet community rather than our own efforts to locate the parishes, so the info is pretty up to date.

Posted by: GDAF on Tuesday, 5 September 2006 at 1:06am BST

The initiatives seem clear: oust the queer folks and make new warm overtures to the ultra-conservative believers who left earlier. A healing new conservative religious strategy of sorts. Is all this new puritan vigor going to rest from all its labors, after it has vanquished all remaining strains of progressive inquiry or ideas inside the new, improved communion? Time will tell, maybe.

I just hope that this newly realigned communion ceases to delight in all this meanness when it finally arrives at its borders, having successfully welcomed back its most conservative dissenters at the same time it newly escorts any partnered and parenting queer folks to the nearest church exits. One imagines the single queer folks who are just dating would have left, even earlier, as the realignment gathers on our local horizons like a movie about a perfect storm.

All indications in USA seem to suggest that it will then use its purified conservative conformities to put pressures on citizens outside of its redrawn faith community spectrums, all toward increased narrowness of mind, heart, and punishment of body. What an odd, happenstance alliance of the rightwing Anglican churches with the prison-building complex. Test the spirits.

I cannot view this as anything like a goodwill movement at work, even from a strictly pragmatic, democratic, or humanitarian point of view, let alone as a mean-spirited iteration of a certain manner of following Jesus of Nazareth.

In a way, it all doesn't matter yet, up close and personal, as I am a queer adult citizen who has promises to keep to the adults and children around me, and these conservative self-righteous pieties have nothing or little constructive to say to me about the miles I have yet to go in living out these promises (with the help of the non-mean Jesus who doesn't suck, as the younger kids would say) before I sleep.

From the looks of it so far, and statistically projecting the realignment trends to come, I can guess that I will certainly need and enjoy the rest. Thank God for alternative family life. Thank God for the love and support of straight allies. Thank God for all the wonderful queer folks who resisted in the streets, opened new doors and windows to self-understanding, and got released from jail to do it all over again the next day, week, month, year. Lord have mercy.

Posted by: drdanfee on Wednesday, 6 September 2006 at 3:04pm BST
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