Sunday, 17 December 2006

weekend opinion columns

Geza Vermes wrote in the GuardianFace to Faith column that Mary was probably not a virgin in the modern sense of the word.

Christopher Howse wrote in the Telegraph about a Remarkable piece of cardboard.

Jonathan Sacks wrote in The Times about Chanukah, in Candles in memory of a clash of civilisations.

Posted by Simon Sarmiento on Sunday, 17 December 2006 at 6:52pm GMT | TrackBack
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Categorised as: Opinion
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The requirements for the Moshiach do not require a "virgin" but a young woman of suitable morality. Jesus was Moshiach Ben David for that Generation and Mary satisfied the requirements for maternity. It just happened to be a particularly spectacular incarnation, one of God's big "don't ignore this one" moments - like the parting of the Red Sea.

Sacks article was excellent, I also loved this article that went up on the weekend http://www.algemeiner.com/generic.asp?ID=43

This article reminds us that put "...into historical perspective, had Antiochus succeeded, Judaism would have died. Its daughter religions — Christianity and Islam — would have never emerged on the world arena."

I also liked the comments in both Sacks and Algemeiner articles that what is celebrated is not the military or grab for power victories. As the Algemeiner article concludes:

"the torch of morality and the light of redemption would never be extinguished.

Imperial Greece and Rome have long since disappeared. Civilizations built on power never last. Those built on care for the powerless never die. What matters in the long run is not only political, military or economic strength but are we managing to ignite the flame of the human spirit."

Which parallels some of Sacks' insights from the conclusion of his book "To heal a fractured world":
- that religions reach their highest levels when they stop worrying about other people's souls and care, instead, for their needs of their bodies; and
- that no religion that persecutes others is worthy of respect, nor one that condemns others, entitled to admiration.

Posted by: Cheryl Clough on Sunday, 17 December 2006 at 7:30pm GMT

"the torch of morality and the light of redemption would never be extinguished."

But it has a l o t of background to shine against.

Posted by: Göran Koch-Swahne on Sunday, 17 December 2006 at 10:10pm GMT

Happy Yom Tov !

What a wonderful festival.We are fortunate to have such ready access to the thinking, teaching and articles of rabbis and other Jewish teachers, nowardays.

Posted by: laurence on Monday, 18 December 2006 at 12:55am GMT

The piece on John Newman is tender and evocative.
Also - brings out the pathos of a found object

Posted by: laurence on Monday, 18 December 2006 at 1:04am GMT
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