Sunday, 24 June 2007

weekend roundup

The Times has Geoffrey Rowell writing about Midsummer is a time to reflect on the joy of song.

In the Guardian Bob Holman writes about Frederick Brotherton Meyer in Face to Faith.

Christopher Howse writes in the Daily Telegraph about Seeking the face of God.

Giles Fraser writes in the Church Times about why The Primates have forced my move to the right.

Posted by Simon Sarmiento on Sunday, 24 June 2007 at 1:30pm BST | TrackBack
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Categorised as: Opinion
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Interesting piece in today's "Observer", published on the 40th anniversary of the passage of the parliamentary bill which decriminalized many homosexual acts. On Lord Arran's earlier, 1965, bill, Geraldine Bedell, author of the article, writes:

"Arran, supported by the Archbishops of Canterbury and York, won his third reading by 96 votes to 31.

"In the Sixties, the Lords led the way, quite unlike the situation in 2000, when the age of consent was finally equalised after the government invoked the rarely used Parliament Act to overrule a House of Lords that had thrown it out three times. Like the churches, the Lords has become more conservative about homosexuality over the years. The Catholic Archbishops of Westminster and Birmingham argued for exemptions in the 2007 Equality Act which would have allowed homosexuals to be turned away from soup kitchens and hospices."

Earlier in the piece, writing of a 1958 letter to "The Times", signed by 30 of the "great and good", among them "several bishops", she notes parenthetically "from our perspective of the early 21st century, when the churches seem so afraid of homosexuality, it's interesting that in this period they consistently and visibly backed reform."

http://observer.guardian.co.uk/review/story/0,,2109769,00.html

Posted by: Lapinbizarre on Sunday, 24 June 2007 at 7:03pm BST
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