Saturday, 6 February 2010

Opinions before Synod

Alan Wilson looks forward to next week’s meeting of General Synod in a Face to face column in The Guardian: How the General Synod works is more important than anything it decides.

Giles Fraser writes in the Church Times that Football needs some humility.

Rowan Williams has written in Newsweek about God and Wall Street. The article is also available on the Archbishop’s website.

John Shepherd writes in a Times Credo column that We all have faith, whether or not we recognise it.

Posted by Peter Owen on Saturday, 6 February 2010 at 9:42am GMT | TrackBack
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Categorised as: Opinion

Giles Fraser is as always, bang on the nail during this week of the (American) Superbowl, but ego isn't limited to sports, does one think that his "excellency" Archidiot --Duncan has gotten too close to the sun with his photographs on trinkets sold on both sides of the pond?

Posted by: choirboyfromhell on Sunday, 7 February 2010 at 1:17pm GMT

"Imagine that – a place where passion and energy to change the world were expressed with deep mutual respect, even in the face of profound and ­heartfelt disagreement. How the ­General Synod works is far more important than anything it decides. You may say that I'm a dreamer. But (I hope) I'm not the only one"
- Alan Wilson -

Alan Wilson's musing on the need for a General Synod reflect, perfectly, the intentions of those provinces of the Anglican Communion which first allowed groups of elected laity, clergy and bishops to join together in Church synodical gatherings - even before the Mother Church of England decided to follow suit.

Why is it that it takes the colonial extensions of the good old C.of E. to initiate the polity of more democratic government within their branches of the Anglican Communion?

My suggestion is that - free from the shackles of state control, local Churches can be open to the unhindered movement of the Holy Spirit to guide them into ways of the Gospel in advocating human justice for all those intimately connected with the local environment, and also work out their relationship to global concerns.

This is why, when the need for opening up the Church to the ministry of women and gays became apparent, this was discussed, prayed about, and canonically authorised in the local context of the Church which saw the need and acted upon it.

True synodical government, when it is working properly, has the sort of checks and balances which prevent hot-heads from high-jacking the majority vote. This is why ACNA, for instance, has only ever been a minority constituency within the North American continent. It has no authority with the synodical government of either TEC or the Anglican Church of Canada. And this is why the General Synod of the Church of England would be acting against the spiritual and mechanical
ethos of lay-clerical-episcopal synod governance if it were to encourage the dissidents of ACNA to subvert the mission of the Church in North America

The ordination of women and LGBT persons in certain Provinces of the Anglican Communion has been duly authorised by the General Synods of those Provincial Churches. This has not hitherto prevented those Provinces from being part of the world-wide Communion. If this situation changes, those prophetic Churches will not disappear, they will simply become part of an emerging group of Catholic and Reformed Churches which seek to follow Christ's call of inclusivity in the Gospel.

Posted by: Father Ron Smith on Monday, 8 February 2010 at 1:05am GMT
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