Thinking Anglicans

more Guardian comment

Harold Meyerson has written Co-dependence day. The right wing of American Episcopalianism wants the Archbishop of Canterbury to save it from its crazy modernist brethren.

Stephen Bates has written Things fall apart. Rowan Williams’s plea to the Anglican communion to hold together appears to have fallen on deaf ears.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
12 Comments
Oldest
Newest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Spirit of Vatican II
Spirit of Vatican II
15 years ago

Things are moving fast? The centre cannot hold? That is rather premature. Akinola is the greatest friend Anglican liberals could have, since no conservative church group in America or Australia can ultimately be happy with his flamboyant rhetoric. His is unwittingly that even among conservatives there will be lots of tensions, and that the same attitudes of endless patience and mutual respect will have to be drawn on. Akinola’s “cancer” image erects gay-related concerns into articuli stantis et cadentis ecclesiae, issues by which the church stands or falls. But what he seems not to realize is that these concerns are… Read more »

NP
NP
15 years ago

“Spirit of V2” writes ‘This “cancer” image bears reflecting on. What is the cancer that the Nigerian Bishops really dread?’ Answer: so called “liberalism” which is a small sect within Anglicanism but not based on the Biblical views which underpin the Articles and history of the church. Why do they fear “liberalism”? -Because it is a parasite on Christianity which is paid by Christians to undermine the church from within; -Because it empties churches as seen in ECUSA which is shrinking by 35,000+ people p.a.; -Because it is not Christianity as taught by Jesus Christ and his Apostles (eg some… Read more »

Christopher Shell
Christopher Shell
15 years ago

Even I as an eclectic (let alone conservatives) see much in Abp Akinola that is far more positive than in his opponents: (1) He cares enough to be passionate about the issues. So many don’t care enough. (2) He realises the high degree of deviation from what wise men and women have always affirmed. (3) He realises the degree to which this is intimately bound up with social conformity. (4) He does not want people to adopt harmful lifestyles. For their own sakes. For their family’s sakes. For their societies’ sakes. (5) He realises that life is not entirely a… Read more »

Merseymike
Merseymike
15 years ago

NP ; do you honestly think that the CofE is going to vote to throw out its entire liberal contingent?

Liberal theology is part of Anglicanism: if you wish it not to be it is you too who are proposing a major change.

J. C. Fisher
15 years ago

“Why do they fear “liberalism”?
-Because it empties churches as seen in ECUSA which is shrinking by 35,000+ people p.a”

Um, NP, I would say that, among the competing ideologies, it’s (extreme) *conservatism* which is prompting that number (?) to leave!

[It’s true that TEC is currently in a “demographic trough”. However, I fully expect that today’s new American immigrants—like yesterday’s American immigrants before them—will assimilate themselves into becoming Episcopalians! ;-p]

NP
NP
15 years ago

Merseymike – look at the ABC’s actions when it came to Reading, Coekin, ECUSA……even the ABC is not backing the liberals because the “liberal” experiment is an obvious failure – expensive and embarassing too. I realise some people have been “liberal” in the hope that their churches will be filled but it just does not work – even in England, Alpha is clearly used by God more than the “believe what you like, it’s all the same to Christ” lie of “liberalism” My hope is that the TEC becomes a reality and all the liberals around the world join it.… Read more »

NP
NP
15 years ago

JCF – fair point re ECUSA numbers falling as “conservatives” have been leaving for decades – probably an error, leaving the leadership to the extreme “liberals”……however, bending over backwards to be “inclusive” has not led to lots of new people coming in to replace the conservatives. The new Christians tend to be highly concentrated in the “evangelical” churches in the US and the UK, as you know, I am sure. The saddest thing about the “liberal” experiment is that many hoped to fill churches by ditching what was considered hard to sell from the Bible but this strategy has only… Read more »

mynsterpreost
mynsterpreost
15 years ago

“He does not want people to adopt harmful lifestyles. For their own sakes.” And so endorses their being bunged into prison until they come to their sense? No, that doesn’t wash, I’m afraid. I think it was the comedian Mike Harding who reflected on the suicide law of England and Wales prior to its reform; “If you try and kill yourself because life doesn’t feel worthwhile, we’ll throw you into jail until you see how lovely your life is.” So, mutatis mutandis, if you’re a Nigerian who doesn’t fancy members of the opposite sex, expect to be thrown into a… Read more »

mynsterpreost
mynsterpreost
15 years ago

“believe what you like, it’s all the same to Christ” lie of “liberalism”

Classic straw man tactic, and, I feel, unworthy.

Most liberal Christians have very strict principles underlying their Christian faith — they simply don’t happen to be coterminous with yours. It would be an equivalent slur if I were to brand all conservatives as six-day creationists supportive of the genocide, ethnic purity, capital punishment and subjugation of women enshrined in Scripture.

Cheryl Clough
15 years ago

Wish I’d posted on this one sooner (sorry). There are parties who are assuming that Jesus doesn’t have an opinion on all this – after all it is to do with what and who he is. As I commented to a colleague a few days ago, Hitler and Mohammad were wiser in that they referred to alternative texts and therefore weren’t using the Book of Truth as a weapon of intimidation. Too many puritans have complained and demanded that rogue elements be intimidated into silence, so Jesus had to come and check out the fracas. Pity for them that Jesus… Read more »

Merseymike
Merseymike
15 years ago

NP; you are deliberately avoiding the fact that NO church is ‘doing well’. The UK is essentially a secular country and the pattern of Sunday churchgoing has disappeared never to return. In a postmodern society, I think liberals are more likely to be able to relate to the diverse spiritual interests which exist, but that will not mean a return to Sunday morning church. We are talking about a totally different approach and way of being and thinking – one which most liberals themselves haven’t even seriously considered. But, they must, because in the UK traditional Christianity is effectively dead… Read more »

Christopher Shell
Christopher Shell
15 years ago

It’s not the case that no church is doing well. Plenty of pentecostal churches are doing very well indeed, and others in other denominations. The overall UK trend is down, in marked contrast to Africa, SE Asia and Latin America

12
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x