Thinking Anglicans

CAPA speaks

Three statements have been issued from the meeting of the Council of Anglican Provinces of Africa (CAPA) :

CAPA Communique, Mauritius, Indian Ocean, October 2007

Eleven of the twelve provinces of CAPA were represented: Burundi, Central Africa, Congo, Indian Ocean, Kenya, Nigeria, Rwanda, Southern Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, and West Africa.


African Archbishops respond to New Orleans, October 2007

Here is part of that:

4. While meeting in Mauritius we received a copy of the report of the Joint Standing Committee (JSC) of the Primates and the Anglican Consultative Council. On first reading we find it to be unsatisfactory. The assurances made are without credibility and its preparation is severely compromised by numerous conflicts of interest. The report itself appears to be a determined effort to find a way for the full inclusion of The Episcopal Church with no attempt at discipline or change from their prior position.

5. We are convinced that what is at stake in this crisis is the very nature of Anglicanism – to understand it simply in terms of the need for greater inclusivity in the face of changing sexual ethics is a grave mistake. It is not just about sexuality but also about the nature of Christ, the truth of the Gospel and the authority of the Bible. We see a trend that seems to ignore the careful balance of reformed catholicity and missionary endeavor that is our true heritage and replace it with a religion of cultural conformity that offers no transforming power and no eternal hope.

6. In our considered opinion, however, there is a possible way forward. The Anglican Communion Covenant is the one way for us to uphold our common heritage of faith while at the same time holding each one of us accountable to those teachings that have defined our life together and also guide us into the future. We therefore propose the following actions:

a. Call a special session of the Primates Meeting.

We believe that meeting together is essential if we are prayerfully to allow the Holy Spirit to work through our interactions and bring us to a common mind. We would need to:

i. Review the actual response made by The Episcopal Church – both their words and their actions.
ii. Finalize the Covenant proposal and set a timetable for ratification by individual provinces.

b. Postpone current plans for the Lambeth Conference

We recognize that such an action will be costly, however, we believe that the alternative – a divided conference with several provinces unable to participate and hundreds of bishops absent would be much more costly to our life and witness. It would bring an end to the Communion, as we know it. Postponement will accomplish the following:
i. Allow the current tensions to subside and leave room for the hard work of reconciliation that must be done.
ii. Ensure that those invited to the Lambeth Conference have already endorsed the Covenant and so can come together as witness to our common faith.

7. We make these proposals in good faith believing that they provide an opportunity for us to reunite the Communion consistent with our common heritage and give us a way forward. We also stand ready to work with the various instruments of the Communion to ensure their success.

The signatures on this statement are:

The Most Rev’d Peter J. Akinola, Church of Nigeria (Anglican Communion)
**The Most Rev’d Justice Akrofi, The Church of the Province of West Africa
The Rt. Rev’d Philip Baji*, The Anglican Church of Tanzania
The Most Rev’d Fidele Dirokpa, Province de L’Eglise Anglicane Du Congo
The Most Revd Ian Ernest, The Church of the Province of the Indian Ocean
The Most Rev’d Emmanuel Kolini, L’Eglise Episcopal au Rwanda
The Most Rev’d Bernard Malango, The Church of the Province of Central Africa
The Rt Rev’d Trevor Mwamba*, The Church of the Province of Central Africa
The Most Rev’d Bernard Ntahoturi, The Anglican Church of Burundi
The Most Rev’d Benjamin Nzimbi, The Anglican Church of Kenya
The Most Rev’d Henry Orombi, The Church of the Province of Uganda
**The Rt Rev’d Johannes Seoka*, The Anglican Church of Southern Africa
The Rev’d Canon Dr. Sami Fawzy Shehata*, Diocese of Egypt
*Representing the Province
** Absent during discussion of Communiqué due to travel schedule

A Statement from the Most Rev’d Ian Ernest, Bishop of Mauritius, Archbishop of the Indian Ocean, the newly-elected Chairman of CAPA

For some background on Archbishop Ernest, see Episcopal Café African Primates wrap up meeting.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
28 Comments
Oldest
Newest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Tim
Tim
13 years ago

`a divided conference with several provinces unable to participate’

Really? They go or they don’t go, at their own discretion. Ability doesn’t come into it.

Still, nothing new in seeking something for which to blame someone else.

Ian Montgomery
Ian Montgomery
13 years ago

What is important as a side issue is the fact that these folk represent 37 million +/- of a communion that realistically has only about 55 million actual members (See Ruth Gledhill’s number counting which reduced the C of E from 27 mil to about 2 mil). Much better if we start by totaling Sunday attendance which is how we now count heads in the EC, USA. Then see where the numbers really are. I deplore the derision that we in the west afford to our family in the global south which now out numbers us. Should we not be… Read more »

Cheryl Clough
13 years ago

Why don’t they just call their own conference with a clear agenda that they are going to set up an alternative communion and on what basis. Then issue the invitations to those they think “worthy” enough. Run it and do it. Then they can with their new communion set up their new US church which is consistent with their theology. Then others can decide whether or not they want to be in communion with them. Personally, I don’t want to be in communion with souls who don’t understand the concepts of natural justice, human rights, honesty or a fair trial.… Read more »

Pluralist
13 years ago

When there’s an ethical issue of this importance, I don’t care if there is half a dozen left. That “they” outnumber “us” is irrelevant. A compromise has been made, and around the British Isles that compromise has been welcomed. Of course some in the British Isles would rather be with “them”. Well they have been talking about joining and assisting in the organising of them. Well, either accept the compromise for the time being or start the organising.

Malcolm+
13 years ago

The traditional 27 million claimed by the Church of England is neither more nor less credible a number than the huge numbers claimed by many other provinces – most particularly Nigeria. And given Dr. Akinola’s willingness to lie about who has agreed to communiques, I see no particular reason to believe him on anything else. That said, it ain’t a numbers game. It was Athanasius contra mundi, but Athanasiaus was right. The eleven timid men gathered with their Lord’s family in Jerusalem that Pentecost weren’t really much to look at in numbers, scholarship or rhetorical flourish. If it’s all about… Read more »

Göran Koch-Swahne
13 years ago

Ian Montgomery wrote: ”What is important as a side issue is the fact that these folk represent 37 million +/ – of a communion that realistically has only about 55 million actual members “ How “represent”? Why is it “important”? Compared to what? Ian Montgomery wrote: “(See Ruth Gledhill’s number counting which reduced the C of E from 27 mil to about 2 mil).” So clever of her… Ian Montgomery wrote: “Much better if we start by totalling Sunday attendance which is how we now count heads in the EC, USA. Then see where the numbers really are.” Always ask:… Read more »

Merseymike
13 years ago

More from HGeadbamnger Corner.

This sort of naive nonsense may pay in the so-called Global South, but we have grown out of it. A matter of simple development and social structure. Social structures much closer to biblical models and countries at that level of knowledge/enlightenment are bound to find literalism more applicable

Thus, let them go off and play nursery school religion, then perhaps we can think seriously about how to make Christianity meaningful in the contemporary west. These people are simply making that task impossible with their outdated delusions. I’m sick of all this pandering to the third world.

Prior Aelred
13 years ago

Well, as I said earlier, “one can hardly expect that primates who have established parishes (or entire dioceses) in the USA are going to be satisfied by anything that could be said or done since it would involve them relinquishing power.”

NP
NP
13 years ago

Sorry chaps and chappesses – don’t think we are going to see 70% of the AC ignored / disenfranchised for the sake of VGR and the agenda of very few, especially given the untrustworthiness of TEC HOB statements – you would have to have won the theological argument in order to achieve that

ruidh
ruidh
13 years ago

In what sense can you say that the bishops of the Global South “represent” the people in their provinces? In Nigeria, at least, the Archbishop, like all bishops, are elected by the House of Bishops. How, then, do they “represent” anyone but themselves?

Göran Koch-Swahne
13 years ago

But the theological argument is in Greek!

Malcolm+
13 years ago

We shall see what happens, NP. But to date only about seven Provinces (Nigeria, Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda, Southern Cone, Jerusalem and the Middle East , Central Africa). No one else has dared to go so far, and internal divisions on the issue in at least two of those (Jerusalem and the Middle East, Central Africa) have broken into the open. In the meantime, we have Australia, New Zealand, Australia, Scotland, Ireland, Canada and the United States – plus Mexico, Brazil, Southern Africa(that’d be ten) who have more or less expressly rejected the call to schism. We have one side that… Read more »

NP
NP
13 years ago

Malcolm – as I said above, around 70% of the real, present-on-Sunday AC membership is represented by those who will not let TEC(USA) change agreed AC positions by unilateral actions which the AC has said are incompatible with scripture….. you can count provinces but if those provinces add up to 20-30% (and declining) of the AC, you might understand why people are willing to see a split (that is, for the health, unity and faithfulness of the AC) and why I and others do not think the ABC is going to let himself go down in history as the man… Read more »

Prior Aelred
13 years ago

Malcolm+ on Monday, 8 October 2007 at 6:53am BST seems to have said it clearly — the ABC clearly is doing all he can to keep TEC in the WWAC — I suspect that there is nothing he can do that will satisfy the schismatics anyway (although goodness knows he has tried).

Beware of the numbers game — once Nigeria, Uganda & Kenya leave & if we discount the inflated figures for the C of E (whose ASA is less than TEC) & should Sydney decide to go its own way, TEC suddenly is the largest province in the WWAC!

NP
NP
13 years ago

Prior ….. do look 10 and then 20 years ahead for this brave new liberal denomination – what do you see? (half the clergy retired and most of the ageing congregations dead?)

Pat O'Neill
Pat O'Neill
13 years ago

“Malcolm – as I said above, around 70% of the real, present-on-Sunday AC membership is represented by those who will not let TEC(USA) change agreed AC positions by unilateral actions which the AC has said are incompatible with scripture…..” As I keep pointing out to you, NP (and as you conveniently ignore), it might be true that “around 70%) of the AC is LED by those you mention, it cannot be said that they are “represented” by the same, since they had no say in the choosing of those leaders. OTOH, I am represented by my diocesan bishop and presiding… Read more »

Malcolm+
13 years ago

We have noticed innumerable attempts to “replace” the Episcopal Church over the years.

The Reformed Episcopalians failed.

The Continuing Anglicans failed.

I see no reason to believe the Common Cause Partnership will do any better – especially since it includes all the usual suspects from the previous failures.

Cheryl Va. Clough
13 years ago

We have won the theological argument sufficiently to prove that tyranny, repression, censorship and vilification are required to prevent God’s grace being meted out to all God’s children, and thus refuting the purpose of Jesus’ sacrifice.

That is all that was required. Everything that comes from now on is simply more decorations and embellishments on the already baked and iced wedding cake.

NP
NP
13 years ago

OK Pat, you think you make a powerful point?

I can make the same point you make….. so, the leadership of TEC USA want to justify certain sins but do they really represent the majority TEC(USA) members??

Actually, Mr Virtue has argued that TEC HOB listens too much to Integrity which has under 2000 members…. so, maybe you do make a powerful point re TEC USA which is pursuing policies, against the AC’s wishes, which are clearly driven by a small minority with a particular agenda – even in TEC USA.

Pat O'Neill
Pat O'Neill
13 years ago

No, NP, you cannot make the same argument. The leaders of TEC are elected by the people they represent…through a sort-of three-tier process, but elected none-the-same. I elect three representatives to my diocese’s annual convention. (In fact, this year, I am one of those reps.) In years leading up to a general convention, the diocesan convention elects representatives to GC. Those GC reps then vote at general convention. If the Pennsylvania see should become vacant, then my parish’s reps will participate in voting for a new diocesan bishop. When ++Jefforts-Schori was elected, reps from my diocese voted in that election.… Read more »

Ford Elms
Ford Elms
13 years ago

“70% of the AC ignored / disenfranchised” NP, for the love and honour of God, explain this! Exactly how is this 70% being disenfranchised? Explain and be clear, if you please, none of this “some EHBL bishop somewhere is persecuting the faithful” but real examples of how 70% of the world’s Anglicans are “disenfranchised” by TEC. I am unaware of any attempt by TEC to stipulate who can be clergy in any other Church, unlike the GS WRT TEC. I am unaware of any move by TEC to tell other Churches what to do, unlike the GS WRT TEC. They… Read more »

NP
NP
13 years ago

Pat – because for years “conservatives” have been leaving TEC(USA), as they continue to do even now, when they realise that TEC(USA) is hijacked by a group with a particular agenda and cannot be brought back into full, genuine unity with most of the AC let alone the church in the world…… Now, if those pursuing your rights based agenda in the AC leads to a split in the AC rather than the exclusion of TEC(USA), then you will be able to tell me that your AC (a few liberal provinces with around 10m and falling) is strangely in line… Read more »

Pat O'Neill
Pat O'Neill
13 years ago

NP:

But how did the liberals get to elect the liberal bishops before the conservatives started leaving because we elected liberal bishops?

You DO see the circular reasoning, don’t you?

And, in any case, who is responsible for the conservatives giving up the fight? If all the Democrats in the USA had stopped participating in elections after 2000, who would be to blame if we now had a 100% Republican government?

NP
NP
13 years ago

Pat – so bored with this….. so, some saw bishops like Spong elected and chose to leave….that strengthened the position of liberlals and more conservatives left…..which strengthened the position of liberals further until they thought they could get away with an action directly against the views of the AC as expressed in Lambeth 1.10….. and so even more conservatives have been leaving…..and TEC is ever more liberal denominated and even more out of step with most of the AC. Anyway, mate, don’t worry about what has happened….. just watch and see how the AC Primates reject the TEC HOB/ JSC… Read more »

Perry Butler
Perry Butler
13 years ago

I imagine you can add Central America, Melanesia, Japan, Korea to your list of those who will come to Lambeth Malcolm.-and i imagine Phillipines and Hong Kong.I would be suprised re S Cone if Peru and Uruguay didnt break ranks …and in some other provinces too. But everyone seems to have forgotten that Lambeth 1948 envisaged the vocation of the Angican Communion was its own extinction….but then we started centralising ( which got a tremendous boost esp from the Anglican / Roman catholic ecumenical endeavour)….perhaps a lot of this in retrospect was something of a blind alley.

Ford Elms
Ford Elms
13 years ago

Disenfranchised, NP? Still waiting for an explanation.

Jerry Hannon
Jerry Hannon
13 years ago

NP posted: “Anyway, mate, don’t worry about what has happened….. just watch and see how the AC Primates reject the TEC HOB/ JSC fudge and the big moves we will see pre Lambeth 08.” Oh dear, NP’s math skills seem to be deficient, as he/she continues to take no consideration for what has already been made clear by Brazil, Canada, Ireland, Mexico, Scotland, South Africa, and United States. And, he/she has also ignored the comments of non-Sydney Australia and New Zealand which make it clear that they are in basic accord with those Provinces. And, Perry Butler has posted a… Read more »

Bob in SW PA
Bob in SW PA
13 years ago

I like this idea that TEC is dying. In the last few months we’ve had young families leaving most Roman Catholic Churches joining my small parish (which is growing). We’re in the diocese of Pittsburgh, known liberals (Well, non-network) and in the rust belt. Our new rector isn’t anywhere near retirement age. On my travels I have attended Episcopal churches in CC Philly, Alexandria, VA, Delaware and North Carolina. All have had a lot of young people and young families. I don’t call that a church headed to oblivion. We need to continue our mission and outreach even in places… Read more »

28
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x