Thinking Anglicans

Lambeth Conference: George Conger's perspective

Two articles by George Conger have just been published in places you might not normally look.

The Institute on Religion & Democracy The Seinfeld Conference: A Reflection on Lambeth 2008

The Christian Challenge The Hollow Men—Lambeth 2008, What Happened And Why

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Tobias HallerMartin ReynoldsFather Ron SmithRobert Ian WilliamsCheryl Va. Recent comment authors
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JCF
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JCF

“published in places you might not normally look”

Nor WOULD I look at the IRD site. They’re a hate group, plain&simple. >:-(

Lord have mercy!

drdanfee
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drdanfee

Gee it is so nice to have both of these commentaries published right now, just so that we are strongly reminded, twice, of just how relentless (and mean? and spin-dried?) the conservative Anglican realignment is. So far as the IRD essay goes, I am cautioned to recall that IRD was a major player in fostering polarizations and big tent destruction campaigns -aimed at Anglicans, Presbyterians, Methodists, and if dim memory serves, Baptists. So far the only wide success of the war has affected the Baptists in USA, at least by consensus accounts. The other Home Invasions of any and all… Read more »

Father Ron Smith
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Father Ron Smith

“..the Anglican Communion no longer worked. Its structures were not a place for holy men, but for hollow men: bishops who knew in their hollow hearts they were stuffed with straw, trapped in a purposeless whirl of apathy and spiritual torpor called “dialogue.” The Anglican Communion had finally broken, coming to an end “not with a bang but a whimper.” – George Conger The above comment, by George Conger in his diatribe, in the so-called ‘Christian Challenge’ article on this thread, betrays once again the deep cynicism of a certain brand of ‘religious’ commentators on affairs within the Church today.… Read more »

Cheryl Va.
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Conger wrote “The Anglican Communion had finally broken, coming to an end “not with a bang but a whimper.”” Gee, I think that was the point. The world really has had enough of Christians banging away. The meek shall inherit the earth, and that requires peace, and that requires tolerance and hospitality, and that means avoiding bangs. So the Communion used as the rubber stamp to entrench and justify misogyny, complacency, repression, sacrifices, conflict, selfishness, and elitism has come to an end? Good. About time. Let those who love violence, repression and conflict be honest about their desires and go… Read more »

Robert Ian Williams
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Robert Ian Williams

Conger is so one sided and his coverage in the Church of England newspaper of the Episcopal Church is farcical…its like having Ian Paisley reporting on the Roman Catholic Church

Father Ron Smith
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Father Ron Smith

“Conger is so one sided and his coverage in the Church of England newspaper of the Episcopal Church is farcical…its like having Ian Paisley reporting on the Roman Catholic Church”

Posted by: Robert Ian Williams on Friday, 24 October 2008 at 6:23pm BST –

Or even perhaps like you, Robert, a newly-formed Roman Catholic, reporting on the activities of the historic Anglican Communion?

Martin Reynolds
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Martin Reynolds

I smiled at Robert Ian’s description of George’s journalistic balance! But putting the obvious aside, this potted history is significant. Histories tend to be written by academics on the winning side so it is very important to have this account from the perspective of those who have hitherto failed to achieve their goals. To be fair George leaves us in no doubt where his own heart lies from the off, so this is clearly an opinion piece and so the “facts” that follow are unsurprisingly interpreted and presented in such a way so as to support the position he declares.… Read more »

Tobias Haller
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It is always tempting to cry, “Insitution X has failed” when the failure is only to achieve one’s own goals. I’ve heard this cry from left and right — what no one seems to want to admit is that Anglicans have and always will be a muddle with some extremists at the edges detaching themselves from time to time, fading to oblivion — or not — depending not on what the other Anglicans do but on how well founded their own campaign is. I mean, the Methodists seem to have done rather well, but most of the Common Cause remain… Read more »