Thinking Anglicans

late June opinion

Jenny Taylor in The Guardian Not a question of conversion. A new C of E report is described as a call not to be embarrassed about ‘conversion’. But ‘conversion’ can’t be any Christian’s aim.

Andrew Brown in his Guardian blog A kumquat hoisted from comments. The Christian churches have moved slowly and partially away from patriarchy in the last fifty years. But every step has been contested.

John Richardson in The Guardian These compromised bishops will not fly. A conservative evangelical condemns the Archbishops’ measures to make room for opponents of women priests.

Giles Fraser writes in the Church Times that Faith in the future is also irrational.

Geoffrey Rowell writes in The Times about The faith that has been handed on to us by the apostles. (registration required)

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MarkBrunsonFather Ron Smithdrdanfee Recent comment authors
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drdanfee
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drdanfee

Alas, John R conservative-evangelical cannot see the handwriting on so many of the walls: banning women hardly rings true to many – no matter how closed-fierce a number still cling to those bans. Let alone does this same ban make a deep-whole church life witness, common sense-ically perceived as deeply-essentially loving across any and all Anglican differences. Or other civic life differences. Why must letting women into med school be a slam dunk modern openness above openness policy utterly unquestioned and utterly taken for granted at the same time that NOT (not, not, not, not) letting women be bishops or… Read more »

drdanfee
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drdanfee

Gee I like Giles Fraser, but in this essay he is mostly playing tricky word games. Fact is, all belief in any and every sort of change for the better has core irrational components – ordinarily called, Hope. One thing GF fails to consider is the practical reality we live – the past is over and done, no matter whether good or bad or mixed or indifferent. The present moment is also often found wanting, in ways that range from a variety of less than ideal valuations, to dire circumstances in which our Now is burdened-improverished and pending deadliness. The… Read more »

Father Ron Smith
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Father Ron Smith

“We may yet see a situation where the Synod votes for a proposal which the Archbishops themselves do not support. Were that, or anything like it to happen it would surely indicate that something is deeply and seriously wrong with a Church where we regularly pray, “May we be united in your truth, live together in your love, and reveal your glory in the world.” – John Richardson, The Guardian – What such a situation would prove, is that the 2 Archbishops are out of touch with the reality of the situation – where the integrity of the women of… Read more »

MarkBrunson
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I’m afraid I’m at odds with both drdanfee and Giles Fraser. The past seems comfortable because hindsight is not 20-20 but warm and, above all, fuzzy. Similarly, the past may seem exciting and offer great potential for fulfillment, but is, after all, a dream as well. The now, though wanting, is all that ultimately has reality or value. The past converges on the now, for better or worse. The future is held in the now, and cannot be formed by dreaming of the day-to-come. God is now. We are now. It is all there is or ever will be. The… Read more »