Thinking Anglicans

opinion for Bible Sunday

Susan Elkin writes in The Independent Restoring holy order: Is the King James Bible the only version we should celebrate? “It is a cornerstone of Western literature and culture. But as the 400th anniversary of the King James Bible approaches, the authors of two new studies argue that its significance may have been overstated.”

Christopher Howse writes in the Telegraph about the Charterhouse in central London: Sacred mysteries: London’s hidden medieval priory.

Andrew Brown asks in The Guardian Do human rights exist?

Alan Wilson writes in his blog about Why new media matter in Church.

Giles Fraser writes in the Church Times about The three options for diversity.

Nicholas Reade (the Bishop of Blackburn) writes in The Guardian that Our most vulnerable have been ‘handicapped’ by this spending review. “If the level of civilisation of our society is judged by its treatment of disabled people, we don’t seem to have got very far.”

Alex Wright writes in The Guardian about Holy faces from the past. “Early frescoes in a Norfolk village remind us of our medieval churches’ more lively past.”

Christopher Howse writes in the Telegraph about What the Pope’s visit changed a month on from Pope Benedict’s welcome to Britain.

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John RochMarkBrunsonFather Ron SmithRod GillisCynthia Gilliatt Recent comment authors
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Cynthia Gilliatt
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Cynthia Gilliatt

Question from across the pond: what is Bible Sunday and who says? Thanks.

More seriously, I am mourning the devastating fire that has nearly totally destroyed the chapel at Virginia Seminary in Alexandria, VA. It started yesterday afternoon about 4 pm. See picture and video on Episcopal Cafe. TBTG, nobody was hurt. So far, no cause. The building is 129 years old – quite young by y’all’s standards – but old enough to have seen generations of VTS seminarians.

Erika Baker
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Erika Baker

Giles Fraser misrepresents Angela Merkel. The German idea of multi-culturalism had been that absolutely no integration of immigrants is necessary and that they would happily live alongside Germans. It’s not a model that was ever really tried in the UK, for very good reason. If people arrive here they need to be equipped to live as well as they possibly can and that includes speaking English, allowing their children to become part of the country they were born into if they wish and at having at least some knowledge about the country they live in. It is not about Germany… Read more »

Marshall Scott
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Elkin’s article came coincidentally with an article from Religion News Service (visible at http://www.kansascity.com/2010/10/22/2344206/how-many-versions-of-the-bible.html) suggesting that so many versions, translations, and “niche” versions are diluting the clarity of Scripture. Focusing on the KJV may not be enough; but focusing to some extent may be beneficial.

Pluralist
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New Labour had fallen out with multiculturalism, and started to demand greater conformity. It was becoming illiberal across the board, and this was yet another example. For all its duffing up the poor, the Conservative ‘Nasty party’ and its Lib Dem wooden leg, at least there is a more of a live and let live element returning (unless on benefits).

By the way, Erika, if you want to get native, it is ‘grey’ not gray.

JCF
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JCF

Andrew Brown asks in The Guardian Do human rights exist?

Very thought-provoking!

Cheryl Va.
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Some things exist not because they are innate, but because they are desired. The concept of human rights is a vision of what could be, it doves tail into the concepts of justice. It is a part of a bigger picture of Creation being wanted and desired by God. Not just heaven, but all of Creation. Not just Christians, but all of humanity. We are not required to be perfect to be loved by God. Creation does not have to be perfect to be loved by God. Evolution, life involve both good and bad; beginnings and endings, change and inertia.… Read more »

Laurence Roberts
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Laurence Roberts

oh I thought Advent had advented a bit early ! Why do they (have to) change everything !

Cynthia Gilliatt
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Cynthia Gilliatt

Peter Owen:
Thanks for info.

Rod Gillis
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Rod Gillis

No doubt Andrew Brown’s satirical column “Do human rights exist?” will provoke sequels of glee from many Anglicans. After all we belong to an institution that, with a few notable exceptions, gives only qualified support to notions of human and civil rights and equality of persons. Churches tend to provide a safe intellectual haven for gender bias under the subterfuge of “theology”. The Anglican Church of Canada, for example, ordains women and priests and bishops, but allows some systemic gender discrimination to go quietly forward. Apparently its not that those who cannot accept a woman hosting at the table of… Read more »

Father Ron Smith
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Father Ron Smith

“the world of secular rationality and the world of religious belief need one another and should not be afraid to enter into a profound and ongoing dialogue, for the good of our civilisation”. – Pope Benedict, from Telegraph art. – This, from the Pope’s own mouth in the U.K., should free people (especially Roman Catholics and Conservative Anglicans around the world) from the fear of entering into reasonable dialogue with supporters of women and gays in the Church. Where, hitherto, conservative Christians have often clung exclusively to former doctrinal certainties, and the tenets of Scripture and Tradition, they are now… Read more »

John Roch
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John Roch

The present Calendar, Lectionary and Collects came into force on Advent Sunday 1997. So the new date for Bible Sunday was first used in 1998. Hardly a recent change. Cranmer’s “read, mark, learn’ collect was moved to the Last Sunday after Trinity at that time. In the Commentary at the back of the book — ==== Use of the RCL does not accord well with the Second Sunday of Advent as Bible Sunday. Even without following the RCL, there is a strong case for moving that observation to the Last Sunday after Trinity or another date of the minister’s choice.… Read more »

Father Ron Smith
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Father Ron Smith

“We in The National Realist Association do not want to outlaw the belief in human rights. That would be absurd. But it is just as absurd, and surely more dangerous, for the rightists to have a specially privileged position. They are allowed to teach in schools, and even protected against discrimination laws and allowed to sack anyone who doesn’t believe in Human Rights.” – Andrew Brown – Methinks, perhaps, Andrew Brown here has his tongue so far thrust into his cheek that it is in grave danger of disappearing up his nostril. His argument is so whimsical that one wonders… Read more »

MarkBrunson
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I read the Brown piece as parody. It sounds like an amalgamation of every type of radical extremist, from the militant atheism of Dawkins (the “rightists” having a “privileged position”) to con-evo homophobes (“rightists” being given the right to teach, being protected by laws), Anglo-Catholic “fascist” moaning (“. . allowed to sack anyone who doesn’t believe in Human Rights”), to Roman Catholic “moralists” (questioning whether such teachings should be “allowed” to be taught to young children, and arguing from “natural law”). What Brown has done is funny, to me, taking the same arguments that all the anti-progressives (and I include… Read more »

John Roch
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John Roch

Never crossed my mind that it could be read as anything other than parody