Thinking Anglicans

ARCIC III: Walking Together on the Way

The third phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC III) published its first agreed statement, Walking Together on the Way: Learning to be the Church – Local, Regional, Universal, earlier this month. The statement is online: Walking Together on the Way. Also available are two commentaries: one Anglican and one Roman Catholic.

News and comment on the statement include the following.

Anglican Communion News Office Groundbreaking document released on how Anglicans and Roman Catholics can learn from each other

Simon Caldwell and a staff reporter Church Times ARCIC III: Anglicans and Roman Catholics can learn much from each other, says new agreed statement

Church Times editorial Bold undertaking

Paul Lakeland The Tablet Give and take: what the Catholic and Anglican Churches can learn from each other

Durham University Centre for Catholic Studies First Agreed Statement from ARCIC III (The Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission, Phase 3)

Christopher Lamb The Tablet New Arcic text charts a way forward

Simon Caldwell The Boston Pilot ARCIC document hailed as ‘groundbreaking’ by Catholics and Anglicans

Nicholas Jesson International Anglican-Roman Catholic Commission for Unity and Mission Agreed statement on ecclesiology: Walking Together on the Way

Joshua J. McElwee National Catholic Reporter Catholic-Anglican dialogue document suggests both churches can learn from other

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Jeremy
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Jeremy

Notable:

‘Later, the Catholic members consider how their church’s “instinct for unity and participation in the greater whole” can sometimes lead to an assumption that “the entire Church always needs to move as one on all things, with the consequence that even legitimate cultural and regional differences are suppressed.”

‘”While there are acknowledged tensions within the Anglican Communion, the Roman Catholic Church might fruitfully learn from the Anglican practice of provincial diversity and the associated recognition that on some matters different parts of the Communion can appropriately make different discernments influenced by cultural and contextual appropriateness,” they write.’

Paul Waddington
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Paul Waddington

It is long in words, but short in content.

Roderick Gillis
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Roderick Gillis

Another rich and carefully considered ecumenical document. The section on Primacy, and the description there of the respective roles of The Bishop of Rome and the Archbishop of Canterbury, the latter described in para. 135,is certainly of interest, and timely as well.

CRS
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CRS

Paragraphs 137-149 really get at the issues. With the role of Bishops in TEC now being altered, the paragraphs are even more timely in identifying tensions.

CRS
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CRS

I’d be surprised if more liberal anglicans would like much in here, especially with the reflexive assumption of Instruments of Communion, greater role for Canterbury, implicit endorsement of the logic of the Covenant, assumed role of Bishops are so forth.

Roderick Gillis
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Roderick Gillis

I’m someone who has been concerned for some time with the increasing hierarchicalism in our Anglican Communion. I’m concerned with the postcolonial ‘strong man’ episcopal leadership in some places in the Communion especially where that kind of leadership is beholding to or in cahoots with repressive governments. The courting in some quarters of American culture warriors as found in ACNA is a petty aggravation as well. So, I am grateful that, Walking Together on the Way, takes note of the role of laity in Anglican polity ( e.g. see:Section IV paragraphs 81-93). One notes, as well, the challenges we face… Read more »

CRS
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CRS

My wife and I worship at the Catholic church in our area (we live in the catholic rectory in a smaller village nearby). I have never seen the equivalent of laity involvement anywhere in TEC or for that matter in Lutheran and Kirk contexts I have experienced firsthand. Catechesis, hospital chaplaincy, music, eucharistic distribution, funeral involvement, readings in church. Each month one receives a daily lessons/Sunday lessons/meditations/HC texts booklet in the mail. I was asked to give a major address on the 500th anniversary of the Luther movement, by a Lutheran church in Pittsburgh, whose pastor was a former student.… Read more »

Pat O'Neill
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Pat O'Neill

“I have never seen the equivalent of laity involvement anywhere in TEC or for that matter in Lutheran and Kirk contexts I have experienced firsthand. Catechesis, hospital chaplaincy, music, eucharistic distribution, funeral involvement, readings in church.”

Clearly, you’ve been in the wrong dioceses and/or parishes. All of these things have been quite common in the parishes I have been a member of, in Pennsylvania and New York. OTOH, the US Roman Catholic parishes I grew up in were notable for their absence of lay involvement and, indeed, the discouragement of it.

CRS
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CRS

Yes, PON, it’s called Vatican II. My point was in reference to lay involvement in all these areas.

Pat O'Neill
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Pat O'Neill

No, I was still a Catholic long after Vatican II…and the lay involvement was never encouraged in my parishes. The pastor ruled…and really didn’t much care what the laity wanted. And lay involvement in all the things you mention–especially music, eucharistic distribution, and readings–have always been a part of the Episcopal parishes I’ve been a part of .

Roderick Gillis
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Roderick Gillis

Regarding lay participation in the R.C. and Anglican Churches ( see posts by Crs and Pat O’Neill), the observation by CRS about R.C. lay participation is accurate. Laity are involved in many places in the educational and pastoral ministries, have been for some time, and this is noted in Walking Together on the Way. However, in the Anglican Church of Canada, for example, lay ministry has a long standing significant role in the form of catechists and parochial and diocesan lay readers (some of whom held licenses to preach). Laity are Eucharistic ministers both in the liturgy as well as… Read more »

CRS
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CRS

Not sure if you are trying to make a distinction between ACC and RCC, but when you write “lay ministry has a long standing significant role in the form of catechists and parochial and diocesan lay readers (some of whom held licenses to preach). Laity are Eucharistic ministers both in the liturgy as well as taking the sacrament to the sick and shut-in, as lectors , leading the prayers of the people, are trained pastoral visitors in homes and hospitals, are involved in community outreach and so forth” — this is exactly the role laity have in the RCC we… Read more »

Roderick Gillis
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Roderick Gillis

Re Crs: To reprise, I am agreeing with you about the role of laity in pastoral, educational and some administrative roles in the R.C. tradition. What you describe as a familiar where you are as a guest worshiper in an R.C. parish is true here and elsewhere for them, and has been for some time. (As Walking Together on the Way notes). Lay ministry is long a feature of parish life for Anglicans here as well. It can be just as vibrant as its R.C. counterpart. I’ve had long standing involvement with lay training in our church overtime. (The only… Read more »