Thinking Anglicans

Gender pay data for the CofE’s NCIs

The Church of England yesterday published its 2018 gender pay data for the National Church Institutions (NCIs). The accompanying press release (copied below) does not include links to the report (or to the restated 2017 report) but I have found them here:

NCIs 2017 Gender Pay Report
NCIs 2018 Gender Pay Report

The entry on the government gender pay portal is here.

Press release

Church of England National Church Institutions (NCIs) publish gender pay data for 2018

20/11/2018

The National Church Institutions (NCIs) of the Church of England published today its gender pay gap report for 2018. Based on a snapshot date of 5 April 2018, today’s report covers one common pay policy for 491 staff across the seven legal entities, and a separate performance-related policy for 31 staff in the Investments department of the Church Commissioners. The data released today does not include clergy or employees within individual dioceses.

The NCIs also restated and published today the Gender Pay data from the previous year (2017).

In 2017 original published figures had calculated the gender pay gap as the percentage of a female’s average salary whereas regulations define the measurement against male’s average salary.

This had previously resulted in the 2017 gender pay difference being overstated. The reported mean gap in 2017 was 21% (previously stated it was 27%) and the median gap was 28% (previously stated it was 41%). The restated figures are published today.

The restated figures are now available on our website and will be shortly available on the government gender pay portal.

The 2018 data shows progress is being made by the NCIs in addressing the gender pay gap and have seen signs of improvement:

  • The NCIs saw a drop of 4% in the median pay gap to 24% compared with the restated 2017 figure whilst our mean pay gap remained the same at 21%.
  • When splitting new recruits over past year into equal quartiles, 64% of those in the upper quartile were female, higher than the current NCI average of 37%
  • For new joiners, we achieved a 0% median pay gap in the mid-upper quartile and 5% in favour of females in the upper quartile

Gender Pay Gap

  • The mean salary for males is £49,202 and for females is £38,869. The difference of £10,333 equates to a 21% difference in favour of males.
  • The median salary for males is £43,316 and for females is £32,711. The difference of £10,605 equates to a 24% difference in favour of males.

Quartile Representation

  • 56% of NCIs current workforce is female
  • 64% of new joiners within the upper quartile were female, this is higher than our current female representation of 37%
  • We continue to see a large proportion of females in the lower and mid-lower quartiles compared to the UK average, this subsequently impacts on the average pay for females being lower than males
  • For new joiners, we achieved a 0% median pay gap in the mid-upper quartile and 5% in favour of females in the upper quartile

Commenting on the findings, Carole Harden, Interim Director of People and Change for the National Church Institutions said:

“This year’s results are encouraging as we continue to review pay structures, addressing any imbalances and barriers to females and opportunities for advancement within the NCIs. We are committed to improving this further as we focus on reducing the difference in pay between men and women in more highly paid roles, and improving the ratio of men to women in the most senior and most junior roles.”

Notes to Editors

The NCIs are separate legal entities, but they are a common employer under a statutory partnership. The present arrangements were established under the National Institutions Measure 1998.

The seven NCIs are:

  • The Archbishops’ Council
  • The Archbishop of Canterbury (in his Corporate Capacity)
  • The Archbishop of York (in his Corporate Capacity)
  • The Church Commissioners for England
  • Church of England Central Services*
  • The Church of England Pensions Board
  • The National Society (Church of England) for Promoting Religious Education

The majority of NCI staff are based at Church House in Westminster, Lambeth Palace, the Church of England Record Centre in Bermondsey, and Bishopthorpe Palace near York.

* This covers support functions including HR, Finance & Resources, IT, Legal, Communications, and the Record Centre.

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Anon
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Anon

Thankfully, this doesn’t include clergy. The gender disparity over whether clergy are paid (or not) is shameful.

Kate
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Kate

So a gender pay gap of 21% is “encouraging”. That didn’t come across very well, did it.

I think many parishioners who put money into the collection and not a few ministers, will be shocked at the massive pay levels in the NCIs.

Bernard Silverman
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The NCIs should be given credit for publishing their figures in advance of most employers, and for giving a clear summary of the results (except for one point made below). Some points for further consideration 1. If you go to the Government website which publishes all the data, you can compare the NCI with all the 10534 employers who submitted returns. Last year, about 70% of the others had a smaller mean pay gap than NCI and 85% a smaller median pay gap. It’s too soon to say whether the NCI’s fairly marginal improvement makes much of a difference to… Read more »