Thinking Anglicans

Opinion – 16 March 2019

Jesse Zink Church Times The ACC: A spurned Instrument of Communion
“As Primates assume more authority, the Anglican Consultative Council is being marginalised”

Stephen Parsons Surviving Church How abuse survivors are betrayed
and Too important to care about child sexual abuse? Problems for Church and State

Richard Moy A Reasonable Enthusiast The Myth of Episcopal Oversight in the UK Church

ViaMedia.News is continuing its series of Daily Reflections for Lent 2019; details are here. An example is this one by Alex Clare-Young.

William Cook The Spectator Taking the God option: why I send my children to C of E schools
“No, it’s not because they get better results, but because they teach peace, hope and compassion”

5
Leave a Reply

avatar
3000
4 Comment threads
1 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
5 Comment authors
TessaRichard AshbyJim Benton-EvansRod GillisFrDavidH Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest
Notify of
FrDavidH
Guest
FrDavidH

William Cook’s article makes one feel it might be worthwhile being an Anglican after all.

Rod Gillis
Guest
Rod Gillis

Re: Jesse Zink on the Anglican Consultative Council, nothing particularly new here, but it is helpful to have it chronicled. Among the items Zink catalogues , “The 2016 ACC meeting also took the discomfiting step of electing a Primate — the Most Revd Paul Kwong, of Hong Kong — as its chairman..” Discomforting indeed. Archbishop Kwong has not been popular with pro-democracy activists in Hon Kong, Christians among them.

Jim Benton-Evans
Guest
Jim Benton-Evans

Frustrating to see Richard May labouring under and perpetuating the delusion that the Church of England is the UK Church, and that our experiences of episcopacy in other Anglican UK churches are somehow the same (hint: they’re not).

Richard Ashby
Guest
Richard Ashby

I can’t read the Spectator article, but is William Cook saying that state schools don’t teach peace, hope and compassion? Really?

Tessa
Guest
Tessa

I have a child in year 6 at a community primary and they teach Sats, sats and more sats with very little attempt at a broader curriculum, let alone much in the way of values. The article may have a point.