Saturday, 16 July 2016

Opinion - 16 July 2016

Andrew Brown The Guardian If the Conservative party’s doing God again, what sort of God is it?

Giles Fraser The Guardian The agony and ecstasy of Saint Theresa, the vicar’s daughter

Loretta Minghella, CEO of Christian Aid gave the Inclusive Church lecture for 2016 at Liverpool Cathedral this week: Does Poverty have a Woman’s Face?. [48 minute video]
Update: the text of the lecture is also available as a PDF download.

Language about or addressed to God should be derived from human experience, not just from men’s experience, argues Prof Adrian Thatcher, a trustee of Modern Church, in a new booklet Gender-Inclusive Language and Worship. The 36-page booklet can be downloaded or purchased in hard copy from the Modern Church website.

Posted by Peter Owen on Saturday, 16 July 2016 at 11:00am BST | TrackBack
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Categorised as: Opinion
Comments

"The Agony and the Ecstasy" - was Charlton Heston in that movie?

Posted by: Pam on Saturday, 16 July 2016 at 12:34pm BST

I don't know about "Saint" Theresa but I was delighted when the other female candidate decided to leave the fray following her ridiculous comments in the Times interview.
I was conducting a Worship Guild meeting when the unbelievable news came through that Mrs. May had incredibly appointed Boris Johnson as Foreign Secretary. My reaction was similar to that of Angela Eagle's! What on earth was she thinking about appointing man who with his previous crass comments has insulted the present President of the USA, hopefully, the next President of the USA, the beleaguered President of Turkey and a whole host of African children? I know that every Court needs a Jester but to have appointed BoJo the Clown to the Foreign Office is surely a step too far.
As for "doing God" I do hope that the Christian Faith of the vicar's daughter who now occupies Number 10 has an influence on her future decision making. In the fairly left-wing speeches she has so far made it seems to be working.
Certainly she must have read the final book of the Bible concerning the Apocalypse before she carried out the Cabinet Reshuffle for it resembled for many - the Dreadful Day of Judgement making MacMillan's "Night of Long Knives" look like a Vicarage Tea Party.

Posted by: Father David on Saturday, 16 July 2016 at 4:06pm BST

Liked the article by Giles Fraser. Très drôle.

Posted by: Rod Gillis on Saturday, 16 July 2016 at 4:52pm BST

Pam, Heston played Michaelangelo (shudder) opposite Rex Harrison's pope.

Posted by: MarkBrunson on Sunday, 17 July 2016 at 10:39am BST

The new PM's father was indeed likely to have been of the Anglican Catholic tradition, having been trained at Mirfield. However, a liking for the hymn "Therefore, we before him bending" is not confined to those of that tradition. It was included in The Book of Common Praise (1938) in its Canadian and Australian editions - still in use in places, the person who led the work on that book being a good moderate Evangelical - and musician - and Icelandic scholar (!), the late Bishop Charles Venn Pilcher, who after serving in Canada came to be Coadjutor Bishop of Sydney ! (On far more important matters, here in Sydney and Australia at least, Brexit has been welcomed by many. Perhaps a more independent Britain will now turn outwards again, especially to the Commonwealth realms of the Queen that, among other things, lost so many men in all the wars in which their people volunteered to served alongside Britain, not least in Europe, the battles of Fromelles and Pozieres particularly in mind at this time.

Posted by: Chaplain John Bunyan on Sunday, 17 July 2016 at 12:03pm BST

The link to download the Inclusive Church booklet "Gender- Inclusive Language and Worship" tells me I am not authorised to access the resource. Is there another route to download this, please?

Posted by: Anne on Sunday, 17 July 2016 at 12:55pm BST

Sorry Anne, try

http://modernchurch.org.uk/downloads/viewcategory/14-forewords

Posted by: Kate on Sunday, 17 July 2016 at 1:18pm BST

Anne - it tells me that as well. But if you go to the page where this booklet can be purchased, there is a "Free download" link which does work. I've amended the links above to remove the one that does not work.

Posted by: Peter Owen on Sunday, 17 July 2016 at 1:27pm BST

On the subject of "Therefore, we before him bending", the tune has been a long-term favourite of mine, although in my experience, the words were "Let all mortal flesh keep silence..."

I love the John Rutter version of this tune:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpPm1cxy2B0

Well worth a listen, especially the last verse with a wonderful descant.

Posted by: Susannah Clark on Sunday, 17 July 2016 at 2:31pm BST

Thank you so much Kate and Peter. I have now downloaded the booklet.

Posted by: Anne on Sunday, 17 July 2016 at 5:42pm BST

'Therefore we before him bending' are the opening words of the fifth verse of a seven verse hymn 'Now my tongue the mystery telling' Pange lin­gua glo­ri­o­si cor­por­is mys­ter­i­um in its original latin. Often referred to as Pange Lingua or by the incipit of the last two verses Tantum Ergo. Ascribed to Thomas Aquinas and probably written for the feast of Corpus Christi, it is the last two verses which are used at Benediction. To refer to the hymn as 'Therefore we before him bending' implies a familiarity with the rite of Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament.

Posted by: Disgraceful on Sunday, 17 July 2016 at 6:42pm BST

"To refer to the hymn as 'Therefore we before him bending' implies a familiarity with the rite of Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament."

No it doesn't. The hymn appears in the 'Communion' sections of hymn books, and is used in places where Benediction would be completely alien.

Posted by: John Roch on Monday, 18 July 2016 at 10:36am BST
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