Thinking Anglicans

Opinion – 21 November 2018

Andrew Forshew-Cain ViaMedia.News There Can Be No Half-Way House on Marriage Equality

Andrew Lightbown Theore0 Talking of mission, poverty, isolation and mental health

Laudable Practice Why we need Choral Mattins

James Alexander Cameron Stained Glass Attitudes A practical guide to the Cathedrals of England

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Gender pay data for the CofE’s NCIs

The Church of England yesterday published its 2018 gender pay data for the National Church Institutions (NCIs). The accompanying press release (copied below) does not include links to the report (or to the restated 2017 report) but I have found them here:

NCIs 2017 Gender Pay Report
NCIs 2018 Gender Pay Report

The entry on the government gender pay portal is here.

Press release

Church of England National Church Institutions (NCIs) publish gender pay data for 2018

20/11/2018

The National Church Institutions (NCIs) of the Church of England published today its gender pay gap report for 2018. Based on a snapshot date of 5 April 2018, today’s report covers one common pay policy for 491 staff across the seven legal entities, and a separate performance-related policy for 31 staff in the Investments department of the Church Commissioners. The data released today does not include clergy or employees within individual dioceses.

The NCIs also restated and published today the Gender Pay data from the previous year (2017).

In 2017 original published figures had calculated the gender pay gap as the percentage of a female’s average salary whereas regulations define the measurement against male’s average salary.

This had previously resulted in the 2017 gender pay difference being overstated. The reported mean gap in 2017 was 21% (previously stated it was 27%) and the median gap was 28% (previously stated it was 41%). The restated figures are published today.

The restated figures are now available on our website and will be shortly available on the government gender pay portal.

The 2018 data shows progress is being made by the NCIs in addressing the gender pay gap and have seen signs of improvement:

  • The NCIs saw a drop of 4% in the median pay gap to 24% compared with the restated 2017 figure whilst our mean pay gap remained the same at 21%.
  • When splitting new recruits over past year into equal quartiles, 64% of those in the upper quartile were female, higher than the current NCI average of 37%
  • For new joiners, we achieved a 0% median pay gap in the mid-upper quartile and 5% in favour of females in the upper quartile

Gender Pay Gap

  • The mean salary for males is £49,202 and for females is £38,869. The difference of £10,333 equates to a 21% difference in favour of males.
  • The median salary for males is £43,316 and for females is £32,711. The difference of £10,605 equates to a 24% difference in favour of males.

Quartile Representation

  • 56% of NCIs current workforce is female
  • 64% of new joiners within the upper quartile were female, this is higher than our current female representation of 37%
  • We continue to see a large proportion of females in the lower and mid-lower quartiles compared to the UK average, this subsequently impacts on the average pay for females being lower than males
  • For new joiners, we achieved a 0% median pay gap in the mid-upper quartile and 5% in favour of females in the upper quartile

Commenting on the findings, Carole Harden, Interim Director of People and Change for the National Church Institutions said:

“This year’s results are encouraging as we continue to review pay structures, addressing any imbalances and barriers to females and opportunities for advancement within the NCIs. We are committed to improving this further as we focus on reducing the difference in pay between men and women in more highly paid roles, and improving the ratio of men to women in the most senior and most junior roles.”

Notes to Editors

The NCIs are separate legal entities, but they are a common employer under a statutory partnership. The present arrangements were established under the National Institutions Measure 1998.

The seven NCIs are:

  • The Archbishops’ Council
  • The Archbishop of Canterbury (in his Corporate Capacity)
  • The Archbishop of York (in his Corporate Capacity)
  • The Church Commissioners for England
  • Church of England Central Services*
  • The Church of England Pensions Board
  • The National Society (Church of England) for Promoting Religious Education

The majority of NCI staff are based at Church House in Westminster, Lambeth Palace, the Church of England Record Centre in Bermondsey, and Bishopthorpe Palace near York.

* This covers support functions including HR, Finance & Resources, IT, Legal, Communications, and the Record Centre.

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Can the dons sack their dean?

Modern Church has published an interview in which Professor Linda Woodhead interviews Professor Gillian Evans:

Can the dons sack their dean? An interview with Oxford historian Gillian Evans on Martyn Percy’s predicament

A PDF of the full text of the interview is also available via a link at the end of the above article.

Prof G.R. Evans is Emeritus Professor of Medieval Theology and Intellectual History in the University of Cambridge. She is author of The University of Oxford: a new history and writes regularly on higher education policy issues. She co-authored Managing the church?: Order and organization in a secular age with Martyn Percy in 2000. She lives in Oxford.

Linda Woodhead MBE is Professor of the Sociology or Religion at Lancaster University. She has been President of Modern Church since 2014. She is author with Andrew Brown of That Was the Church That Was: How the Church of England Lost the English People. She is currently a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University, USA.

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Anthony Cane to be next Dean of Portsmouth

The Bishop of Portsmouth has announced that the next Dean of Portsmouth will be Canon Dr Anthony Cane, currently Chancellor at Chichester Cathedral.

The diocesan website carries more information: Bishop announces new Dean of Portsmouth.

The cathedral website has Chichester Cathedral Cleric Is New Dean Of Portsmouth.

Chichester has this: Cathedral Chancellor is new Dean of Portsmouth and Chichester Cathedral Chancellor to be new Dean of Portsmouth.

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Christ Church Oxford suspends Dean

Updated Monday afternoon

There have been several media reports in recent weeks about the actions taken by the Governing Body of  Christ Church in relation to a complaint against its Dean, Martyn Percy.

The Bishop of Oxford has issued this statement: Diocesan Synod statement concerning the Dean of Oxford.

Saturday 17 November 2018: The Bishop of Oxford gave a statement to the meeting of the Oxford Diocesan Synod. The full text of the statement can be read below. Following media enquiries over the weekend the College confirmed that Martyn Percy has been suspended from his duties pending the tribunal’s outcome. Bishop Steven said; “As always in such circumstances, suspension is a neutral act and does not imply that the complaint will be upheld.”

The Very Revd. Professor Martyn Percy

You may be aware that a formal complaint has been made against the Dean of Christ Church, Martyn Percy.

Christ Church is a complex institution and, uniquely in the Church of England, the Dean is also Head of an Oxford College. The Governing Body and Chapter have now requested that the complaint against Martyn, which relates to a governance matter, be properly reviewed by an independently chaired internal tribunal.

Martyn is a close colleague, widely respected across the Church and his absence is keenly felt. The tribunal must now conduct an impartial, thorough and fair review of the complaint that has been made.

I remain in close contact with Martyn and Emma and with the Subdean and Chapter and the wider college through this difficult period. I am monitoring the situation closely. I also want to see that any allegations of bullying are properly investigated. Meanwhile the Cathedral’s core work of prayer and the worship of God continues, albeit in very testing circumstances.

We wish Martyn a speedy recovery to full health following a period of sickness in recent weeks and commend all those involved in this difficult situation to the prayers of the diocese.

+Steven Oxford

The most recent media reports are these:

ObserverBullying claims at Oxford ‘medieval fiefdom’ take toll on reformist dean

Mail on SundayCorrections and clarifications which relates to this article, two weeks ago: Modernising Oxford University dean is taken ill after alleged ‘hellish bullying campaign by dons to oust him’

Earlier reports include: Church TimesDean of Oxford, Martyn Percy, faces removal from office and this week the Church Times opinion columnist Angela Tilby wrote: A reforming dean may be unpopular.

Local Oxford coverage has included:

Oxford Mail: Dean of Christ Church in Oxford faces tribunal

Oxford Student: Christ Church Dean In Tribunal Over Pay

Cherwell Online: Christ Church dean faces coup

A fundraising site has been established here, which contains a summary of some of the points at issue in this case:

It appears therefore that Martyn’s position is a uniquely powerless one. It takes just seven complainants under the statutes of the college to request a tribunal to remove the Dean of Christ Church. Three strange steps appear to have led to this position.

First, the Dean was offered no proper investigation, at which evidence from both sides could be heard, read and weighed.

Second, there was no disciplinary hearing in which he could defend any allegations made against him.

Third, to avoid unnecessary conflict, processes of genuine mediation should always happen. Such mediation is entered into in good faith by both parties – rather than being used as a means to coerce and expedite a virtually immediate resignation, which is increasingly common in workplaces today.

In any normal place of work, a Tribunal would be the very final stage: and only if the investigation, disciplinary procedures and mediation had all failed. In Martyn’s case, the first three stages did not fail: it seems they were not really attempted.

Under the college statutes, the Dean has no grievance procedure available to him either, so he can’t complain about the treatment give[n] him. Consequently, he can do nothing about the bullying and harassment he has received. Under natural justice any person should have rights. But [the] Martyn doesn’t.

Finally, the Dean seems to have no right to free speech. To defend himself, he has to find his own legal costs. His speech is not free. If you think this is unjust, then please help the support fund.

Updates

Archbishop Cranmer: The harrowing of Martyn Percy: Oxford University denies natural justice to the Dean of Christ Church

Surviving Church: Oxford Bullying and the Church of England

21 Comments

Opinion – 17 November 2018

Stephen Parsons Surviving Church Democracy and Theocracy. In praise of Choice and Christian Freedom

Keith Giles Patheos Why John 3:16 Isn’t About The Crucifixion

Cristian Ispir British Library Medieval manuscripts blog Medieval hipsters

Robin Ward Church Times How should priests be taught to approach the rite of confession and absolution?
Philip North Church Times Confession: An opportunity, not a risk

Paul Bayes ViaMedia.News Is Agreement Over-Rated?

25 Comments

New Zealand rejects Sydney overlap proposal

Archbishop Donald Tamihere and Archbishop Philip Richardson of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia have replied, on behalf of the ACANZP General Synod Standing Committee, to the proposal made by the Archbishop of Sydney, Glenn Davies, in August.

See GSSC responds to Sydney.

Like it or not, to be Anglican in Aotearoa New Zealand means facing into 200 years of a unique, shared and difficult history between Maori and Pakeha – and acknowledging the pillars of that shared history.

These pou include Anglicans bringing the gospel to these shores in 1814; the foundational and church-brokered Treaty of Waitangi of 1840 – and, after 150 years of struggle by Maori Anglicans, the adoption of Te Pouhere, the Three Tikanga Constitution of The Anglican Church of Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia.

So, a proposal advanced by the Archbishop of Sydney, Dr Glenn Davies, that there should be two Anglican Churches in New Zealand, both linked by heritage – but the new one not recognising “the laws, promises, and solemn commitments” that bind The Anglican Church of Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia, and which grew out of that painful shared history, does not work.

That is the view of the General Synod Standing Committee – and that view has been expressed in an open letter signed by its co-chairs, Archbishops Don Tamihere and Philip Richardson, and sent to Archbishop Davies today.

The letter concludes: “We cannot recognise a Church as Anglican which does not encapsulate this 200 years of relationship and history.”

Anglican Communion News Service reports: New Zealand Church leaders reject Sydney proposal for overlapping Anglican jurisdiction.

Archbishop Davies’ proposal was contained in this document. The proposal was described in Sydney as: Archbishop presents proposal for NZ Anglican future. We reported it in August as Archbishop of Sydney proposes ‘Distinctive Co-existence’ for ACANZP.

The New Zealand reply to it is contained in this document. It’s worth reading this in full.

The Anglican Church League in Sydney reports it as Thanks, but no thanks: New Zealand Church leaders reject Sydney proposal.

 

13 Comments

Opinion – 14 November 2018

Bill Carroll The Episcopal Café Our piece of the puzzle

Trevor Thurston-Smith The Pensive Pilgrim Rediscovering the Sacrament of Reconciliation

Rosie Harper ViaMedia.News Remembering, Reliving & Dealing with the Church’s Abuse

Andrew Brown Helmintholog The trouble with religion

22 Comments

Statistics for Mission 2017

Updated Thursday to add press reports

The Church of England has published its Statistics for Mission 2017 today. The report can be downloaded here.

Also published today is a report on the Church of England’s digital reach: A year in numbers: 2018 digital report.

In addition there is a press release which is copied below.

Press reports

Madeleine Davies Church Times Could the Christmas effect boost attendance through the year, Bishop asks

Christian Today Mixed picture for CofE in latest attendance figures

Mike Wright The Telegraph Church of England sees regular attendance rise but churchgoers struggle to make traditional Sunday services

Harriet Sherwood The Guardian Attendance at Church of England’s Sunday services falls again

Church of England press release

Christmas attendance at highest level for more than a decade

14/11/2018

Attendance at Christmas services in the Church of England is at its highest level for more than a decade, according to new figures published today.

The latest annual Statistics for Mission report shows that while traditional Sunday attendance edged lower in 2017, in line with long-term trends, the numbers attending Christmas services increased by 3.4 per cent to 2.68 million.

It was the fourth successive rise in Christmas congregations since 2013 and the highest figure since 2006. Combined with figures for special services in churches during Advent, including carol services, there were nearly eight million attendances over the festive season.

The Statistics for Mission 2017 were published as #FollowTheStar, the Church of England’s campaign to encourage people to attend Advent and Christmas services this year, was launched by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby.

Meanwhile separate figures also published today show that the Church of England more than doubled its monthly reach on social media – from 1.2 million in 2017 to 2.44 million this year.

(more…)

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Book Launch: Intimate Conviction

You are invited to the launch of a book that addresses the role of the church (past, present and future) in the criminalization of consensual same-gender intimacy across the Commonwealth. This event is scheduled for Dec. 4.

Last year Anglicans for Decriminalization, the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network and our local and international partners held the “Intimate Conviction” conference in Jamaica.

This was the first-ever global event that discussed the role of the church (past, present and future) in the criminalization of private consensual same-gender intimacy. The event was live-streamed and there were presentations by international agencies and Christian leaders from all over the Commonwealth, including the Commonwealth Secretariat, the Archbishop of the West Indies and the Bishop of Buckingham.

An edited volume of some of the presentations is now ready and will be launched in London on 4 December. Attendance is free but booking is required.

Details here:  Intimate Conviction Book Launch.

School of Advanced Study
Room 349 Senate House-South Block
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HU

Date: Dec. 4
Time: 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Refreshments will be provided.

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Faith, Science & Sexuality: a day conference

The Ozanne Foundation is holding a one day conference on Saturday 8 December, involving some of the UK’s most senior academics from the fields of science, health and ethical issues surrounding sexuality and gender, whilst also rooted in real lived experience of well-known LGBTI Christians. Hosted by the Dean of St Paul’s, the Very Revd Dr David Ison, this confernece will offer Christians the opportunity to engage with the professionals who are at the forefront of science, sexuality and faith.

Tickets and more details of the programme can be obtained from this link.

David Ison has written about the background to this event here: Brexit, Science & Sex: Can We Challenge Fake News?

And Robert Song has written this: The science of sexuality.

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Bishop of Albany refuses to implement same-sex marriage resolution

Updated again Tuesday morning

We reported previously on the Diocese of Albany in September: Diocese of Albany considers same-sex marriages.

Further context for this is contained in another earlier article: Communion Partner bishops issue FAQ on same-sex marriage.

Episcopal Café now reports: Albany bishop draws red line, challenges authority of GC

…Bishop Love has decided to draw a line based on his personal beliefs and understanding of his role on behalf of the entirety of the diocese of Albany; “B012 ignores God’s Word regarding marriage and thus ignores the authority of Holy Scripture.” He lays the blame for General Convention’s actions squarely on Satan and the “Gay Rights Agenda.”

“While I don’t question the sincerity or the well intentions of many in the Episcopal Church who believe the best way to love and minister to our Gay and Lesbian Brothers and Sisters in Christ is to embrace them in their sexuality and make provisions for their same-sex attractions through same-sex marriage rites, I do believe they have been deceived into believing a lie that has been planted in the Church by the “great deceiver” – Satan. In his letter to the Ephesians, Paul states: “…stand against the schemes of the devil. For we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers over this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places.” (Ephesians 6:11-13).
The Episcopal Church and Western Society have been hijacked by the “Gay Rights Agenda” which is very well organized, very strategic, very well financed, and very powerful. Satan is having a heyday bringing division into the Church over these issues and is trying to use the Church to hurt and destroy the very ones we love and care about by deceiving the leadership of the Church into creating ways for our gay and lesbians brothers and sister to embrace their sexual desires rather than to repent and seek God’s love and healing grace. B012 plays right into this.”

Read the full text of his Pastoral Letter and Pastoral Directive here.

The Albany Times-Union reports this news: Albany Episcopal Bishop outlaws same-sex marriage in his churches.

News & World Report has this: Episcopal Bishop, William Love, Bans Gay Unions on His Turf.

Tuesday Updates

Episcopal News Service Albany bishop rejects General Convention compromise on gay marriage, refuses to allow rites

Presiding Bishop’s statement on Bishop William Love’s pastoral letter and directive

And the bishop of the adjacent diocese ( Central New York) has also issued a statement available here.

93 Comments

Opinion – 10 November 2018

Trevor Thurston-Smith The Pensive Pilgrim My Journey into Catholicism

Andrew Lightbown Theore0 Talking of sex, sin and church unity

Stephen Parsons Surviving Church Secrecy, Cover-up and the Cause of Truth

Colin Blakely ViaMedia.News Is an Armistice Needed for Divided Nations & Churches?

2 Comments

Opinion – 7 November 2018

Jeremy Pemberton From the Choir Stalls Fake Participation: what is wrong with Living in Love and Faith?

Martin Sewell Archbishop Cranmer Iwerne: what did David Conner (now Dean of Windsor) and others know about John Smyth’s regime of abuse?

Stephen Parsons Surviving Church Safeguarding and the Church’s future

David Mitchell The Guardian Trust the Church of England to miss the point of Halloween

Ben Ryan LSE Religion and Global Society blog Christianism: A crude political ideology and the triumph of empty symbolism

Michael Sadgrove Woolgathering in North East England The Centenary of the Great War: Thoughts on Good Remembrance

Jeremy Morris ViaMedia.News We Will Remember Them…..All!

30 Comments

CofE Statistics for Mission 2017 – Social Action

The Church of England collected figures on the extent of social action by its churches were collected as part of the annual Statistics for Mission 2017 survey, and these have been published today.

The findings can be downloaded here, and there’s a press release which starts:

Full extent of Church of England work to support local communities revealed

More than 33,000 social action projects – from food banks to debt counselling – are run or supported by churches, according to figures setting out for the first time the full scale of the Church of England’s service to communities.

The findings – which amount to the largest survey to date of the extent of the Church of England’s work with some of the most vulnerable in society – show that 80 per cent of congregations are involved in one or more forms of social action…

The full Statistics for Mission 2017 report will be available soon.

Press report

Christian Today Survey shows massive engagement in social outreach by CofE churches

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Responses to the Oxford bishops’ letter

 

Updated Tuesday morning (scroll down)

Media reports:

Comment:

…The Oxford bishops are committed to building a Christ-like church and have identified three values as animators of this aspiration: compassion, contemplation and courage. By pledging to listen to the experiences of LGBTIQ+ Christians and allowing such experiences to help shape the future direction of the church, alongside the acknowledgment that ‘as a Church we have continually failed our sisters and brothers in Christ’ the bishops have shown real compassion. Listening, deep listening, is of course also the very heart beat of contemplative practice. In writing this letter, in the sure and certain knowledge that there will be some very real kick-back, and through their insistence, that silence does not serve the Church well, alongside a commitment to express their own views with integrity the Oxford bishops have been courageous, for courage is worked out in the most difficult, most contentious and most potentially divisive issues.

One of the most moving responses I have seen so far to the Oxford bishops’ letter on inclusion came from someone who said that she was surprised and delighted by the way in which the bishops made her feel part of the church by their words. Usually, this kind of official pronouncement makes gay people feel slightly ‘other’, a separate order of humanity within the church, but here the respondent was grateful to feel like she was genuinely listened to and part of the same church…

Marcus goes on to discuss at some length the article by Giles Goddard on Via Media to which we linked yesterday.

…The bishops also announce in the letter that they will be setting up a chaplaincy for LGBTI+ people and their families across the diocese.  We very much look forward to seeing how this latest exciting development unfolds, and hope and trust that LGBTI+ people will continue to be integral to the development, delivery and dissemination of this important and innovative work.

…We would encourage other dioceses to consider following the Oxford lead, to meet with LGBTI representatives from within each diocese to listen to their concerns, and to say explicitly that LGBTI people are welcome in their diocese, and should be welcome in each and every parish.

The LGBTI community and their allies are looking for tangible proof that the words”radical new Christian inclusion” are being taken seriously by each diocese. It is in concrete proposals, such as the provision of LGBTI chaplaincies and the creation of LGBTI reference groups, that they will begin to be reassured that a truly inclusive welcome is sincerely being offered for all…

Update

For a roundup of comment from a conservative viewpoint, see Anglican Mainstream’s post: Oxford Diocese promotes inclusion.

 

7 Comments

Opinion – 3 November 2018

Jen Williams A brave faith What Open Table means to me

Janet Fife Surviving Church Shibboleths and the Love of God

Giles Goddard ViaMedia.News C of E Risks Failure on Human Sexuality Because of Privileged Power

Church Times No action songs, please: there are adults present
“Services that infantilise are counter-productive, says Ines Hands”

27 Comments

Opinion – 31 October 2018

Stephen Parsons Surviving Church Challenges for Lambeth 2020. The end of the Anglican Communion?

Erika Baker ViaMedia.News Gender Recognition Act – Whose Lives Are Actually At Risk?

David Ison ViaMedia.News Brexit, Sex & Science: How Do We Tackle “Fake News”?

Winnie Varghese Patheos Oh, preacher, give us a good word

Andrew Brown The Guardian The Church of England should learn from Harry Potter this Halloween

55 Comments

Oxford bishops expect inclusion and respect for all

Press release from Diocese of Oxford:

31 Oct 2018 – four bishops from one of the largest dioceses in the Church of England have written to 1,500 ministers setting out the bishops’ expectations of inclusion and respect for all and announces a new LGBTI+ chaplaincy team.

Silence is both painful and damaging for LGBTI+ people in the midst of continuing debate within the Church about human sexuality, say the bishops. Their letter, sent to all clergy and LLMs in the Diocese of Oxford, sets expectations of inclusion and respect towards all and affirms LGBTI+ people called to roles of leadership and service in the church.

The Oxford letter commends five principles for welcoming and honouring LGBTI+ people and looks at work underway in the Church of England to develop new pastoral guidance and teaching resources relating to human sexuality and same sex marriage.

A new chaplaincy team for LGBTI+ people, their families and loved ones is promised too. The chaplaincy team will also provide LGBTI+ insights and advice to clergy and bishops about being church together.

The Oxford letter concludes with a commitment from the bishops to continue to listen well to LGBTI+ people from a variety of perspectives, ‘including those seeking change in the Church of England’s polity and those seeking to live faithfully within it’…

The full text of the letter can be found here: Clothe Yourselves With Love.

17 Comments

Opinion – 27 October 2018

Andrew Lightbown Theore0 Reflecting on ecumenism, liturgy and mental health.

Harriet Sherwood has interviewed Michael Curry for The GuardianBishop Michael Curry: ‘moderate religious voices’ are not being heard.

Stephen Parsons Surviving Church Reflections on human power. The Christian stand against bullying

Andrew Lightbown Theore0 Speaking of cathedrals, mission and evangelism.
Archbishop Cranmer Why, when church attendance is falling, is cathedral attendance soaring?

Fergus Butler-Gallie Church Times ‘Stay weird, Church of England’
“Fergus Butler-Gallie celebrates the evangelistic potential of the weird, and mourns their demise”

Madeleine Davies Financial Times Why I’m still an evangelical in the age of Trump [£]
“Madeleine Davies explains why she isn’t giving up on the movement despite its support for the president”

47 Comments