Thinking Anglicans

Who we are

Thinking Anglicans is initially the work of three people. We have invited a number of others to join us and will list them here in due course.

Simon Kershaw was born in Warwickshire, read Physics at Wadham College, Oxford, and since then has worked in the computer software industry for a variety of companies.
Married with two adult children, he now lives in St Ives near Cambridge. He has contributed to a number of publications, including A Companion to Common Worship, vol 1 (SPCK 2001, edited by Professor Paul Bradshaw), Come to the Feast (Canterbury Press 2001, by Gill Ambrose and Simon Kershaw), and Exciting Holiness, second edition (Canterbury Press 2003), and compiled Common Worship: Daily Eucharistic Lectionary for Canterbury Press. He is a member of the Liturgical Commission of the Church of England, and is a lay Canon of Ely Cathedral.

Simon Sarmiento was born in Sheffield and graduated in Industrial Management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is now retired from a major British software company, where he served for a decade as personnel director and later as head of internal IT.
Married with four grown-up children, he worked in the USA for a while, and lived in St Albans Hertfordshire from 1971 to 2014 where he worshipped at the Cathedral and Abbey Church of Saint Alban. He is part of the team that publishes Anglicans Online and has been a consultant to Church House Publishing. He now lives in Knaresborough, North Yorkshire.

Peter Owen was born in Southend-on-Sea, read Mathematical Physics at Birmingham University and has a DPhil in Astrophysics from Sussex University. He taught mathematics in higher education for thirty years before taking early retirement in 2000.
He lives in the suburbs of Liverpool and is a worshipper and former churchwarden at St Luke’s Church in Crosby. He is part of the team that publishes Anglicans Online. Outside the church, he chaired an NHS Research Ethics Committee for seven years is now a member of the Greater Manchester West Committee. He was a member of General Synod from 1995 to 2005.

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Justice and Spirituality: proclaiming the kingdom of God

Thinking Anglicans is a website for thoughtful contributions to the proclamation of the gospel message. Here writers reflect on what it means to be a Christian, particularly in Britain today.

Thinking Anglicans will actively report news, events and documents that affect church people, and will comment on them from a liberal Christian perspective.

Thinking Anglicans proclaims a tolerant, progressive and compassionate Christian spirituality, in which justice is central to the proclamation of the good news of the kingdom of God. Our spirituality must engage with the world, and be consistent with the scientific and philosophical understanding on which our modern world is based. It must address the changes which science and technology have brought into our lives.

Thinking Anglicans takes the form of weblogs (or ‘blogs’) in which writers place their thoughts in public for all to read. We each take responsibility for our own words. There is no central definition or declaration of faith to which contributors must subscribe, although most of our writers are active Christians in communion with the see of Canterbury. Rather there is a range of opinions, which contributes to debate, and is legitimate diversity within the Christian faith. The site will be updated frequently, with regular contributions from our team of writers, commenting on news events and exploring wider issues and deeper meanings.

Thinking Anglicans is a focal point where you can find the words of informed contributors to the contemporary understanding of Christian faith, as well as the views of ordinary ‘Anglicans in the pew’. In a world where the voices of fundamentalism and conservatism are frequently heard, Thinking Anglicans is a place for a tolerant, thoughtful and understanding exploration of Christian faith. We hope this shared witness of the vision of God’s kingdom in the world will help and encourage both Christians and others.

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